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How to Get Dark Mode Design Right

Dark themes are everywhere these days. 

As human beings continue to spend more of their time interacting with technology, dark themes provide a more relaxing way to engage with the digital world. More often than not, these themes are easier on the eyes, more attractive, and perfect for the dedicated user

Throughout 2020, countless leading brands have debuted their own version of the dark theme. Google has a solution for your Drive, while Apple and Android have built dark theme performance right into their operating systems. 

If you haven’t learned how to make the most out of dark mode yet, then you could be missing out on an excellent opportunity to differentiate your design skills, and earn more clients going forward. 

Why Dark Mode?

Before we dive too deeply into the possibilities of creating your own dark theme, let’s examine what dark mode is, and why it’s so effective. 

Ultimately, dark themes are created to reduce the amount of luminance emitted by everything from your desktop and laptop, to your smartphone and smartwatch. Dark themes help to improve the visual ergonomics of design, by reducing eye strain, adjusting brightness to suit current lighting conditions, and more. Additionally, many dark mode offerings are also fantastic at conserving battery life. 

Here are some of the main benefits of adding dark themes to your design portfolio

  • Better user experience: A focus on user experience is one of the most important trends of the digital age. You need to be willing to deliver incredible experiences to everyone who visits your website if you want to stand out today. Dark mode reduces everything from eye strain, to battery power consumption. This helps to keep customers on a website for longer.
  • Innovation and cutting edge appeal: Most companies want to prove that they can stay on the cutting edge of their industry. The ability to offer an opt-in dark mode version of a website theme or appearance can help your clients to stand out from the crowd. As the environment becomes more mobile-focused, more companies will be looking for designers that can provide the best mobile experiences. 
  • Support for universal design: Dark mode isn’t just great for people who have light sensitivity at night. This solution could be more comfortable for visually-impaired users who would struggle with eye strain when visiting your websites otherwise. If you want your content to be more inclusive for a wider range of viewers, then learning how to design for dark mode is a good way to start.

Best Practices When Designing for Dark Mode

Designing for dark mode is easier than you’d think. Most of the time, it involves simply thinking about how you can replace some of the brighter, more overwhelming aspects of your site, with something deeper and darker. 

Here are some useful tips that will get you moving in the right direction. 

1. Experiment with Colors

A big issue for a lot of web designers when it comes to developing a dark mode solution is that they get too caught up with things like pure white text against pure black backgrounds. However, this high-contrast option can be a little much after a while. 

It’s often much easier to use a dark grey as your primary surface color, instead of a true black. Additionally, rather than using bright white, think about slightly off-white alternatives that will be warmer to the eye.

Experiment with surfaces and color combinations that are unlikely to cause too much eye strain. Dark grey foundations often offer a wider range of depth, too, because you can demonstrate shadows on grey. 

Additionally, when you are experimenting with colors, remember that saturated colors often vibrate painfully against very dark surfaces, making them harder to read. Desaturating your colors will help to reduce the contrast and make your websites more welcoming. 

Lighter tones in the 200-50 range will have better readability on dark themes. However, you can always experiment with your choices. Google Material Design recommends using a contrast level of around 15:8:1 between your background and text. 

2. Consider the Emotional Impact

Much of the effort involved with dark mode design is figuring out how certain colors work together. It’s easy to get carried away with stark contrasts, particularly when you’re used to working with a white background. However, you need to remember that you’re designing for a user that’s primarily looking for an easier and more subdued browsing experience.

While you’re working, remember to consider the emotional aspect of the design too. The emotion in colors can make or break a buyer’s journey in any environment. However, an often overlooked-aspect of color psychology, is that people perceive shades differently when they’re on a black background

For instance, think of the color green. On a light background, it conveys nature and even financial wealth. However, on a dark background, the same green could come across as something venomous, toxic, or even sickly. It’s important to think about the kind of impressions end users are going to get when they arrive on your site.

3. Give Users the Freedom to Choose

One of the biggest mistakes you can make when you begin designing for dark mode, is thinking that you should focus entirely on your dark themes, and nothing else. This lines you up for a problem if you interact with users who want the best of both worlds. If you’re designing for apps in particular, you’re going to need web pages that can switch naturally between light and dark themes. 

Learning how to implement both a dark mode and a light mode option into the desks you create will help you to reach a wider selection of customers. Remember, you’ll need to test the performance and impact of your designs in both themes, to check that they deliver the same kind of experience, no matter how your user chooses to browse. 

Although dark mode should offer a different experience to end-users, it still needs to feel as though they’re browsing on the same website. That means that you’re going to need to experiment with the most natural combination of light and dark mode options.

4. Remember the Basics

Remember, although the three tips above will help you to get on the right path for dark mode design, you’ll also need to consider the opportunities and limitations of the platforms that you’re designing for. The kind of dark mode experience you can deliver for Google Chrome websites is going to be very different to what you can create for something running on iOS.

Examining the documentation provided by the system that you’re designing for will help you to develop something with a close insight into what’s actually possible. 

Other top tips for dark mode design include:

  • Focus on your content: Make sure that your content stands out on the page, without being too overwhelming. 
  • Test your design: In both light and dark appearances, you need to make sure everything is working as it should be.
  • Adopt vibrancy for your interfaces: Vibrancy helps to improve the contrast between your background and foreground. 
  • Use semantic colors: Semantic colors adapt to the current appearance of a website automatically. Hard-coded color values that don’t adapt can seem more aggressive. 
  • Desktop tinting: Try experiment with things like transparency and filters to give your websites and apps a slightly warmer tint – ideal for late-night browsing
  • Icons: Use individual glyphs and icons for dark and light modes if necessary. 

Ready to Design for Dark Mode?

Preparing your web development and design portfolio for an era addicted to dark mode can be a complex experience. You need to think carefully about how people are going to browse through your websites and apps when they’re searching for something more subtle, and less visually overwhelming than the websites that we’re used to making. 

The most important thing to remember is that everything on your website or application should look just as beautifully tailor-made in dark mode as it does in light mode. Simply adding a dynamic black background when people want to switch settings in an app isn’t enough. You need to go in-depth with your designs and examine how different fonts, colors, and images work together.

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Source de l’article sur Webdesignerdepot

Les nouvelles technologies à l’assaut du secteur de la construction

Le BIM n’est pas encore une réalité pour les acteurs du monde de la construction. Toutefois, l’innovation n’est pas absente de ce secteur, avec des avancées notables dans la collecte des données et la gestion des équipements lourds.

Augusta Reeves est un spécialiste SAP depuis plus de 20 ans, comptant une dizaine d’années d’expérience dans le secteur de la construction. Il propose la solution métier Fit2 Construction, qui couvre les aspects suivants : devis, commandes, facturation, planification et gestion des chantiers, avec un suivi de l’avancement des travaux assuré en temps réel. Le tout s’appuie sur des technologies SAP.

Pour André Baveux, Président d’Augusta Reeves, « le secteur de la construction est celui qui a le moins gagné en productivité ces dernières années, car il souffre structurellement de marges faibles ». Les nouvelles exigences réglementaires sur la gestion des déchets et des plans comme BIM 2022 n’arrivent pas encore à faire bouger les lignes. Plus que pousser les entreprises dans la bonne direction, ces actions sont en effet vues comme des contraintes supplémentaires sur un marché pourtant déjà en tension.

Toutefois les grands groupes du secteur, qui ont une rentabilité supérieure aux autres acteurs du marché, mènent une veille technologique active.

1re rupture : les smartphones

Pour innover dans le secteur de la construction, il est impératif de proposer des solutions qui ne demanderont pas d’investissement important et qui proposeront un ROI immédiat et net.

La première rupture détectée par Augusta Reeves vient des téléphones mobiles. Les chefs de chantier et chefs d’équipe sont tous équipés de smartphones. « Un outil idéal pour de la collecte de données, analyse André Baveux. Les smartphones proposent aujourd’hui des écrans suffisamment grands pour de la saisie de données, sans être aussi fragiles que les tablettes. »

Il est impératif toutefois de créer des solutions dont l’ergonomie est adaptée à la taille d’écran des smartphones. Et qui sont utilisables par des personnes peu à l’aise avec la technologie et disposant d’un temps limité. « Il faut que la collecte soit ciblée et simple. Par exemple une saisie de temps, ou l’avancement d’une tâche. »

Cette saisie sur smartphone va permettre une collecte de données en temps réel et au plus près du terrain. Auparavant, les chefs de chantier rassemblaient les informations dans un tableau, saisi par la suite en agence et remonté à la société une fois par semaine, voire une fois par mois. Avec des données remontées immédiatement dans le SI de l’entreprise, il est possible de gérer les travaux et coûts en temps réel, tout en simplifiant la tâche du chef de chantier. Analysées, ces données pourront servir à effectuer du pilotage.

2de rupture : les équipements connectés

Autre voie de progrès ne nécessitant pas un investissement massif : l’exploitation des données issues des équipements lourds présents sur les chantiers, comme les bulldozers par exemple.

Les constructeurs connectent aujourd’hui ces équipements en 3G, afin de faire remonter des données sur le taux d’utilisation, les pannes rencontrées, etc. Plusieurs startups proposent des connecteurs permettant aux entreprises de récupérer et exploiter ces données. Il devient ainsi possible de savoir en temps réel où se trouve un engin de chantier, s’il est en cours d’utilisation ou non, et – lorsqu’il est en panne – quel code panne ressort.

Sans avoir à investir massivement, il est donc possible d’exploiter ces données afin d’optimiser le taux de réservation des engins de chantier et leurs cycles de maintenance. Avec quelques technologies complémentaires, la maintenance préventive pourra même se transformer en maintenance prédictive, avec la promesse de bénéfices encore plus importants.

« Le secteur de la construction est longtemps resté sinistré en matière de numérique. De nouveaux SI sont en cours de mise au point, avec des pratiques qui se diffusent, comme le guidage GPS ou les plans électroniques. Ces techniques sont rapidement adoptées, car elles permettent des gains de productivité rapide, résume André Baveux. La révolution numérique est en cours dans le secteur de la construction, mais elle se veut avant tout pragmatique. »

The post Les nouvelles technologies à l’assaut du secteur de la construction appeared first on SAP France News.

Source de l’article sur sap.com

Faire de l’expérience client un avantage concurrentiel

Les clients accordent de plus en plus d’importance à l’expérience qu’ils reçoivent plutôt qu’au prix ou au produit. C’est pourquoi l’expérience client est rapidement devenue une priorité absolue pour toutes les entreprises. En 2020, avec les livraisons à domicile et les mesures de distanciation sociale mises en place en réponse à la COVID-19, les consommateurs sont passés à la commande sur smartphone pour acheter de tout, de la soupe aux noix.

De plus en plus de personnes utilisent des applications mobiles pour faire venir de la nourriture à leur porte. Les consommateurs savent à quel point il est important d’utiliser ces applications, que ce soit dans le confort de leur propre maison ou sur le trajet domicile-travail. Avec des options de personnalisation pour enregistrer leurs préférences, des informations précises sur les prix et des offres à portée de main, les attentes des consommateurs en matière de rapidité et d’absence de friction pour passer leurs commandes n’ont jamais été aussi grandes.

Bien entendu, pour pouvoir offrir une excellente expérience au client à ce niveau, il faut investir dans des technologies et des processus intelligents.

Renforcer les capacités du commerce électronique

Ce n’est pas seulement un dépanneur et un détaillant de carburant typique, mais Casey’s General Stores Inc. (Casey’s) est la cinquième plus grande chaîne de pizzas d’Amérique, avec plus de 19 millions de pizzas servies chaque année. En développant des liens communautaires solides, la marque est intégrée au tissu des petites villes du Midwest, offrant un service de proximité 24 heures sur 24, soutenant des causes importantes et célébrant les héros locaux.

Si la marque a su gagner des adeptes, Casey’s devait faire plus avec ses systèmes de commande et de paiement en ligne. Ils ont été construits sur des logiciels vieillissants qui n’ont pas su suivre le rythme de l’époque, ce qui a eu pour conséquence une expérience client en ligne qui n’était pas à la hauteur de l’essence de la marque, hyper pratique et axée sur la communauté.

Ainsi, dans le cadre de sa transformation numérique, il était non seulement essentiel pour Casey’s de renforcer ses capacités en matière de commerce électronique, mais il lui fallait aussi mettre l’expérience du client au premier plan et répondre plus rapidement aux changements du marché.

Pour ce faire, elle a dû utiliser des technologies intelligentes pour créer une application pratique pour smartphone et un site Web mobile afin de rationaliser les commandes par téléphone portable, ce qui a permis aux habitants de ces villes du Midwest de prendre leurs pizzas préférées très facilement et rapidement. En même temps, dans le but de l’aider à atteindre de nouveaux niveaux de confort, Casey’s a conçu un programme de fidélisation des clients.

citation de Art Sebastian, VP de Casey's

Rationalisation des processus de commande et de paiement

Pour rationaliser le processus de commande et de paiement en permettant aux clients de payer en ligne, Casey’s a déployé les solutions SAP Commerce Cloud et SAP Customer Data Cloud du portefeuille SAP Customer Experience. L’application mobile permet aux clients de passer des commandes de ramassage ou de livraison, de définir une carte de crédit par défaut pour le paiement, de personnaliser les commandes de pizza, de trouver un magasin, de parcourir le menu, de suivre les commandes, de réorganiser les favoris et de vérifier le prix du carburant.

Dans les cinq mois qui ont suivi son lancement, Casey’s a généré environ 65 % de ses revenus numériques grâce à l’application et 30 % supplémentaires grâce au Web mobile.

En lançant son premier programme de fidélité numérique, Casey’s Rewards, sur SAP Customer Data Cloud, Casey’s a organisé les données, le consentement et les préférences des clients et les a reliés directement à ses applications sur SAP Commerce Cloud. D’un seul coup, Casey’s est en mesure de récompenser sa légion de fans avec des offres à valeur ajoutée, tout en l’aidant à mieux connaître leurs besoins – ce qui lui permet en fin de compte de proposer des expériences qui dépassent ces besoins.

Une évolution rapide à l’époque de COVID-19

L’investissement de Casey dans les technologies intelligentes a également permis à ses magasins de rester ouverts pendant la période de COVID-19 et à l’entreprise d’avancer plus rapidement que jamais. Pour répondre aux attentes des clients pendant cette période, Casey’s a donné la priorité aux livraisons sans contact, s’est associé à un service de livraison tiers, a élargi la gamme de produits de marchandises générales disponibles en ligne et a lancé un service de livraison en bordure de trottoir.

Pour en savoir plus sur la transformation numérique de Casey’s, nous avons rencontré Art Sebastian, vice-président de Digital Guest Experience chez Casey’s à SAPPHIRE NOW Converge. Dans cette interview de quatre minutes, il décrit comment le détaillant de la supérette a fait de l’expérience client un avantage concurrentiel. Pour en savoir plus, consultez l’étude sur la transformation de l’entreprise, « Casey’s : Building True Customer Loyalty Over Pizza ».

Article publié en anglais sur blogs.sap.com

 

The post Faire de l’expérience client un avantage concurrentiel appeared first on SAP France News.

Source de l’article sur sap.com

Web Design for Seniors: UX From a Mature Perspective

It’s no secret that the senior population is growing. By 2030, people over the age of 65 are predicted to make up 20.6% of the population of the US. 

Around the world, people are living longer and remaining more active in the later years of their lives. What’s more, despite what you might have heard in the past, seniors aren’t as wary of the internet as they used to be. In 2019, the Pew Research institute revealed that 73% of people over the age of 65 were connected to the web. 

So, what does that mean for web designers?

your main focus needs to be on ability…people age differently

Well, first of all, it’s time for all of us to start thinking about user experience from different perspectives. We need to stop expecting our audiences to be made up entirely of iPhone-using millennials and start thinking about the needs of seniors too. After all, designing websites for seniors opens you up to a wide selection of potential visitors in the future.

What’s more, according to the US Census Bureau, people over the age of 65 generally have the highest household wealth figures of any age group. That’s a big deal. 

So, how do you adapt UX for seniors?

Creating Senior-Friendly Web Designs

When it comes to designing websites and applications for seniors, your main focus needs to be on ability. Age is just a number, and people age differently. 

That means that one person in their 70s might have no problem browsing through Netflix to watch the latest shows, while someone else wouldn’t be able to tell you what ‘streaming’ means. 

Rather than worrying specifically about age, think about how different people in older age groups might have different requirements when it comes to things like movement control, hearing, vision, and even device bias. 

Get the Visual Elements Right

Vision loss is by far the most common disability reported by elderly individuals in the US. Around one in six people over the age of 70 have some manner of visual impairment. That’s why UI designers need to think carefully about visual accessibility when creating the right websites. 

For instance, text and button sizes should always be kept large. Anything that needs to be read or clicked needs to be scaled up, to ensure that everyone can see the information clearly. For instance, on the Sandinmysuitcase.com website, you’ll find clear typography, combined with big buttons that tell you to “Start Here” so you know exactly what to do next.

Remember to stick to icons that are clearly labelled wherever possible. Stay away from anything that your customers might not understand. “Start Here” is easier to read and understand than “Submit”. 

It’s also worth sticking to the color and contrast guidelines laid out by basic UX design when you’re creating something for optimal visibility.  Colors that are too close together might create a nice pastel or gradient effect on a website – but they’ll also make things difficult to read. 

Concentrate on Usability

Over the age of 55, motor skills and coordination can begin to decline for some people. These changes make it harder for people to interact with complex UIs. The mouse on a computer can be a particular problem for people with diminishing motor skills – as can the touchscreen of a tablet or smartphone. 

When you’re working on the perfect UX, think about how you can make things as easy to click as possible for people who have a hard time hitting their targets. For instance, in this website for people traveling over the age of 50, you’ll see not only fantastic large font choices but big buttons that are descriptive and easy to understand too: “Click here to start planning your trip”:

The scrollbar can also be a bit of a problem for people with impaired motor skills. Because of this, it’s best to keep your focus on designing above the fold. Make sure that users don’t need to scroll far to find the information that they need and keep scrollbars simple in terms of their look and feel.

While you’re working on usability, remember that it will be important to keep interactions to a minimum wherever possible. Where you can engage younger audiences with double-taps, swiping and scrolling, it’s much easier to connect with seniors through simple one-tap interactions. The less actions your user needs to take to reach their goals, the better. 

Deliver Smooth Navigation 

Navigating from point A to B on your website needs to be as simple as seamless as possible. Remember, crowded pages on your websites and apps are often overwhelming – even for younger browsers. Seniors are generally just searching for “must know” information, so they don’t want anything to get in their way as they navigate through their website. 

As you work on your site or app design, ask yourself if every element on the page absolutely has to be there. If it doesn’t deliver value, then get rid of it. 

Additionally, remember that seniors don’t always have the best memories and concentration levels. That means that they need your navigation experience to be as simple as possible. Basic horizontal menu bars that show everything at once are often a good idea – even if they’re not very exciting.

Look at this helpful navigation experience from RetireMove.com, for instance. Everything you need is located at the top of the page, and you can even just enter your postcode to get started:

Cognitive decline happens regularly with age. Although not all older adults will have issues with their memory and concentration, it’s important to be prepared for an audience that might process information a little more slowly. It’s worth double-checking that your viewer’s attention isn’t being diverted to multiple parts of the page at once.

Get to the Point Quickly

While younger generations have quickly implemented technology into every aspect of their lives, older consumers use tech a little differently. These people don’t want to spend forever fiddling around with different parts of your website. They want to get the answers to their questions as quickly and easily as possible. 

Applications that are complicated or difficult to access are usually instantly rejected by seniors. Even if you’ve offered everything that we’ve covered above, from seamless navigation to minimalist design, you still won’t get the interactions you’re looking for if older adults don’t consider your design to be useful. 

Because of this, you need to highlight the point of a website or application to your seniors as quickly as possible. Avoid worrying about things like gifs, animations and gamification. Instead, focus on making sure that your designs are useful and simple. 

For instance, from the moment your senior user arrives on a web page, they should have instant access to clear instructions on how to use the application or service, and what they need to do next. Keep in mind that this is particularly important when you’re creating mobile apps, as apps are still a relatively new concept to older generations. 

On the “When They Get Older” website, you can instantly find the information you need in a well-organized navigation bar that’s labelled clearly:

A clear interface like this, combined with simple, step-by-step guidance that shows elderly individuals how to get the information that they want is the key to keeping these users coming back for more. 

Bringing a Mature Perspective to Web Design

These days, most designers focus heavily on younger audiences when creating websites and apps. After all, it’s these users that allow us to experiment more with the latest tools and concepts, like augmented reality, artificial intelligence, and robust animations. 

However, there’s still a market out there for the seniors of the world that want more opportunities to get online. This audience often goes ignored and under-served. However, as the value of older consumers grows, and their ability to interact online increases, you’ll find that more businesses begin to search for web designers who can provide immersive experiences for a more mature audience. 

The steps above will give you an excellent insight into how you can start designing for a different kind of customer base. However, remember that the best way to make sure that you’re delivering the right solution for any customer, is to test. User testing will provide you with the exclusive insights that you need to determine whether your senior UX is really working, or whether you’re still struggling to get into the shoes of an older user. 

 

Featured image via Unsplash.

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Source de l’article sur Webdesignerdepot

Case Study: 8 Design Tips That Increased My Ecommerce Conversions By 42% 

When it comes to increasing sales for your ecommerce store, there are 3 levers you can pull: You can increase your average order value; You can increase the amount of traffic to your site; You can increase your conversion rate.

While all of the above are important, the cheapest, most effective way to grow your sales is by improving your conversion rate.

For most online stores, low conversion rates are typically the result of a poor design or a bad user experience. Your visitors may not resonate with the look and feel of your website or they may have problems finding the information they need in order to make a purchase.

In this post, I will walk you through the exact steps I took to increase my desktop conversion rate by 46% and my mobile conversion rate by 39% with my last site redesign. I will also show you how you can apply these same design principles to optimize the conversion rate for your own online store.

Even if your ecommerce business is already performing well, this post will help you achieve even better results.

What Is Considered A Good Ecommerce Conversion Rate? 

Monitoring your conversion rate is crucial to building a profitable ecommerce business. And most analytics tools can help you measure this data out of the box.

Your conversion rate is calculated by simply dividing the number of desired actions by the number of website visitors in a given period. For example, if your website is getting 50 conversions for every 5,000 visitors, your conversion rate is 1%.

Depending on the specific type of online business you run, your conversions may include online sales, email signups, add to carts, or any other KPI you wish to measure. But in the case of an ecommerce store, your primary focus should be your purchase conversion rate.

On average, ecommerce stores have a purchase conversion rate of 1% – 2%. What’s more, experts say a good conversion rate is anywhere from 2% to 5%. This should be your baseline as you measure your online store’s success.

The Conversion Results of My Last Site Redesign

Before we dive into the nitty gritty details of how I improved my conversion rate, here are my overall results and exactly how I conducted my experiment.

First off, I run Bumblebee Linens, an ecommerce store that sells handkerchiefs online.

Because my site gets a ton of traffic from content pages that do not directly convert to sales, I measured my conversion rate based on my most predictable traffic sources.

As a result, all of my conversion data was taken from targeted PPC ad traffic sources like Google Shopping and Google Adwords. After all, my Google ads traffic is very steady and always converts at a consistent percentage.

Before I redesigned my site, the conversion rate for my ecommerce store hovered at around 3% which is above average. But the look and feel of the site was dated and desperately needed a refresh. Overall, the entire redesign took approximately 7 weeks and cost me roughly $1840.

Here are the conversion results from my updated design compared to the original:

  • Desktop conversion rates increased by 46%
  • Mobile conversion rates increased by 26% 
  • Tablet conversion rates increased by 32% 

The remainder of this post will highlight the specific elements of the redesign that contributed to these increases. (Note: I made all of my redesign changes live simultaneously so it’s difficult to determine which specific optimization contributed the most gains.)

8 Ecommerce Design Tips To Optimize Your Conversion Rate

If your ecommerce store is not performing as well as it should, there are many aspects of the user experience that could be negatively impacting sales. Even a seemingly innocuous design choice like your font size or the color of your buttons can have a significant impact on your overall conversion rate.

If you want to systematically improve the conversion rate for your ecommerce store, you should follow these 8 design steps.

1. Use A Consistent and Complementary Color Scheme 

Use color.adobe.com to choose complementary colors when redesigning your website.

A well chosen color scheme can instantly attract a customer’s attention, evoke emotion, and drive users to take action. After all, how a customer feels about your website can be the deciding factor between completing checkout or bouncing from your shop.

A well designed ecommerce store should utilize at least 3 complementary colors that are consistently applied across every page of your website.

If you don’t have a good eye for color, you can use a free tool like color.adobe.com which will help you mix and match different colors that go well together.

For my site redesign, I wanted a modern feel so I chose teal, hot pink, and yellow for my color palette.

I also assigned each color a specific purpose on my site:

  • Teal was applied to give the site a bright, overall color for a young and hip feel;
  • Yellow was used to draw attention to marketing elements like free shipping and special offers;
  • Hot Pink was used for all action buttons on the site.

Overall, every single page of your ecommerce store should have 1 main call to action (using a bright color like hot pink) that guides a customer closer towards checkout.

For example on my front page, the hot pink button “Shop Our Personalized Collection” pops out of the page and catches a user’s attention right away. We want visitors to shop our personalized collection because our personalized products are the highest margin products in our store.

2. Simplify Your Navigation 

Is your menu too complicated? Is your navbar taking up too much screen real estate?

A good rule of thumb for an ecommerce store is to minimize the number of clicks for a customer to add to cart. As a result, you should avoid nesting your product categories in more than 1 level of hierarchy.

If you have too many categories in your shop to display all at once, choose your best selling categories for your main menu and lump your less trafficked categories in a separate tab.

For my store, I decided to use a top-level, hover style drop-down menu as shown in the photo below.

Top-level navigation is one way to organize and display your product categories.

My old design utilized left hand style navigation which took up too much screen real estate. And freeing up the extra space allowed me to blow up my category and product images by 300%. With my new navigation menu, every visitor can add to cart in just three clicks: One click to find a product category; One click to view the product description; One click to add to cart.

Once you’ve designed your menu, pretend that you are a customer and try to shop on your site. Is the content easy to read? Do the important elements pop out? Can you find the information you need right away? Analyzing your site from a customer’s perspective will help you improve your users’ shopping experience.

3. Display Trust Factors On Every Page 

Free shipping, easy returns, and trust are crucial to driving conversions. 

Trust is the most important value you must establish with your customer.

Unless you’re Amazon or a big box store, people have likely never heard of your brand and you have to reassure them that it’s safe to buy from your store.

Due to Amazon’s influence in the ecommerce space, most customers look for 3 things when shopping at an online boutique for the first time:

  • Fast and free shipping;
  • Easy returns;
  • A way to reach customer support.

Displaying your phone number and email address is very important! Adding your store hours also helps to make your site look legit to new visitors. If you don’t have a recognizable brand, customers will want to know that they can reach a real human in case of problems or questions.

In the above image, you’ll notice that I placed my trust factors in the header, so they can be seen above the fold on every single page. We’ve also been featured on the Today show and a bunch of magazines. So I made sure to display this social proof on the bottom of every page.

Don’t hesitate to flaunt your achievements to reinforce trust. 

In addition, customer testimonials provide social proof and credibility to your website. As a result, it’s important to regularly reach out to happy customers for testimonials and endorsements. On our redesigned site, you’ll find the testimonials section right below our press mentions.

Testimonials lend social proof and credibility to your website.

Remember, to generate conversions as an unknown store or brand, you first have to gain your customers’ trust. Make it easy for them to contact you or get a full refund if anything goes wrong with their purchase. By showing a genuine concern for customer satisfaction, you’ll be able to build a solid reputation over time.

4. Emphasize Your Unique Value Proposition

Users spend an average of 5.59 seconds looking at your website’s written content. And in those 5.59 seconds, you must capture their interest or else they’ll bounce from your page. Right off the bat, you must convey to a user exactly what you sell and why they should buy from your store over a competitor.

What’s more, every single page on your site should communicate your unique value proposition. A unique value proposition is a concise statement that describes what makes your business special and outlines what your store does better than anyone else. The best way to show off your unique value proposition is to use an eye-catching image alongside compelling copy.

For example, here’s the first thing a user sees on my home page above the fold:

Right away, a user is shown a large image of one of our best selling personalized handkerchiefs. And right beside that image is a clear and concise value proposition, followed by a call to action to shop in our store.

Displaying your value proposition should not be limited to your home page. We also include our unique value proposition on every category page as well. Overall, you should include your value proposition on every landing page on your website.

5. Optimize The Visual Hierarchy Of Your Product Pages 

Every page on your site should have a single objective. And for your product pages, your goal is to get a customer to add to cart.

When designing a product page, you must apply a logical visual hierarchy to your design. A visual hierarchy is the order in which a user processes information on a page and in the case of a product page, there must be a clear path to your add to cart button with as few distractions as possible.

Here’s a screenshot of my old product page:

As you can see, my old product page is overwhelming. All of the design elements try to grab your attention at the same time and there are many different calls to action that blend together. To improve my product descriptions, I freshened up the color scheme and enlarged my product image by 266%. I also changed the placement of the buttons in a more logical flow.

Here’s what the redesigned product page looks like today:

By adjusting the size, color, contrast, and alignment of the page elements, I now force the customer to process my product information in a set path that leads directly to my primary call to action. For example, the hot pink color draws attention to the “Add to Cart” button over the “Reviews” button. Also, by applying a blue text color and teal background, I reassure customers that shopping with us is safe and risk free.

Overall, rearranging the design elements this way nearly doubled my add to cart percentage.

6. Simplify Your Checkout Process 

With our old site design, we would regularly receive feedback from confused customers who weren’t sure if they needed an account to purchase our products.

Here’s what our old checkout page looked like:

As you can see, there are too many choices. After all, a customer doesn’t need 3 ways to checkout and the choices are a little overwhelming.

Here’s what the checkout page looks like now:

Instead of offering 3 separate options for checkout, I consolidated them all into one and added a separate Paypal option (more on this later). First off, less than 6% of customers create an account so there was no reason to offer account creation as a separate option. Furthermore, displaying a login form was causing more headaches than it was worth because the majority of customers don’t even have an account. As a result, I decided to hide the form altogether by default.

Overall, when you are designing your checkout process, keep these optimization principles in mind.

Principle #1: Remove all unnecessary elements from the page. Don’t make the customer think and hide all elements that are not frequently used.

Principle #2: Display trust logos to assure customers of a secure checkout. In the image above, you’ll find trust logos on the right-hand side of the checkout page.

7. Optimize The Checkout Process For Mobile Users

4 out of 10 mobile users abandon their carts if they have a hard time entering their personal information. People don’t like entering their contact and credit card information using a tiny keyboard. What’s more, small buttons and too many form fields drive away mobile users. 79% of smartphone users shop online with their mobile devices, which is why you should optimize for mobile.

These days, a responsive design is par for the course but you can still screw things up if you are not careful. Here’s what my checkout process looks like on a desktop:

And here’s how the checkout page looks on a mobile device:

On mobile, the user’s cart contents are collapsed so it doesn’t occupy the entire screen. Overall, here were the mobile optimizations I made to checkout:

Optimization #1: Keep Your Checkout Form Short And Sweet

A mobile user should be able to tap buttons on your checkout page without accidentally hitting another option. Also, the buttons should be large enough to tap on a mobile device.

Given the smaller screen size of a mobile phone, keep your checkout form short and sweet with no extraneous options. Also, make sure you turn off autocorrect for your form fields. Otherwise, your phone’s autocorrect feature may frustrate users when they try to enter their address. In fact, we once had a customer get so frustrated trying to type in their city on their iPhone that they called us up and complained in frustration.

To fix this, you simply need to add the following tag to all of your text input fields.

<input type="text" name="name" autocorrect="off">

And to reduce frustration, you should also turn off auto-capitalization and auto-complete by adding auto-capitalization=”off” and auto-complete=”off” to all of your forms as well:

<input type="text" name="name" autocorrect="off" auto-capitalization="off" auto-complete="off">

In addition, for phone number entry, you should always display a numeric keypad as opposed to a regular keyboard:

Optimization #2: Automatically Import Your Customer Data If Possible

The less information mobile users have to enter in, the better. Payment options like Paypal Express and Amazon Payments can simplify the checkout process. These third-party payment processors automatically fill out a customer’s billing and shipping information which reduces typing and increases conversion rates.

To offer a more convenient checkout, I implemented PayPal One Touch, which alone increased my mobile conversion rates by 31%.

Here’s a quick tip when implementing Paypal: Make sure you display the Paypal button early in the checkout process before a user has entered in their information. Otherwise, it defeats the purpose of importing their information! In the first step of my checkout process, I explain each payment option in depth.

These simple changes made a huge difference in my conversion rate. And the number of PayPal users on my site nearly doubled from 13% to 23%!

8. Add A Sense Of Urgency

Most customers like to window shop and the best way to get a visitor to take action is to create a sense of urgency.

Whenever I run a sale, a big yellow countdown timer is displayed on every page of the website.

Note: It’s important to note that we only utilize this timer when there is actually a sale going on. Otherwise, you risk desensitizing your customers or losing trust.

In addition, I also display a countdown timer on the checkout page to create a sense of urgency to complete the payment process:

These extra design elements force a customer to take action sooner rather than later.

Final thoughts

Optimizing your conversion rate is an ongoing process. And testing your results is the only way to track your improvement.

Never go with your gut and always listen to the data. After all, sometimes an ugly site can out-convert a beautiful one.

Regardless, the design tips I demonstrated above will give you a solid foundation to start with. From there, you can further improve your website and optimize your conversion rate through repeated testing and tweaks. Good luck!

Source


Source de l’article sur Webdesignerdepot

How to Improve Largest Contentful Paint (LCP) and SEO

Contentful; Webster’s Dictionary defines “contentful” as… not found. Clearly someone made up this word, but that is not necessarily a bad thing.

The world of user experience metrics is moving quickly, so new terminology is needed. Largest Contentful Paint (LCP) is one of a number of metrics measuring the render time of content on a web page.

What is Largest Contentful Paint?

Google defines LCP as “the render time of the largest content element visible within the viewport.” For what we are talking about in this blog, we will consider “content” to be an image, typically a JPEG or PNG file. In most cases, “largest” points to a hero image that is “above the fold” and is one of the first images people will notice when loading the page. Applying optimization to this largest content is critical to improving LCP.

It is probably more instructive to view LCP relative to other metrics. For example, First Contentful Paint (FCP) and Visually Complete book end LCP.

Each metric has its pros and cons, but LCP is a happy medium. LCP marks when web page loading starts to have a substantial impact on user experience.

In Google’s opinion, to provide a good user experience, LCP should occur within 2.5 seconds of when the page first starts loading. Poor values are anything greater than 4 seconds.

How Does Largest Contentful Paint Impact Lighthouse Scores and SEO?

LCP is now part of several “Core Web Vitals” scores that Google will measure in its ranking algorithm. Each of the Core Web Vitals represents a distinct facet of the user experience, is measurable in the field, and reflects the real-world experience of a critical user-centric outcome.

In the case of the overall Google Lighthouse score, LCP represents 25% weighting on the performance score of Lighthouse version 6.0. This makes LCP the most important Core Web Vitals metric in determining the performance score.

While Google has indicated that content is still the most important factor in SEO ranking, a better user experience (as measured by Core Web Vitals) will generate higher rankings in a crowded field. If there are many websites competing for the top search engine spots, then Largest Contentful Paint will play a critical factor in rankings.

How to Improve Largest Contentful Paint

Now that you know that LCP is important, what can you do to improve it by making content load faster? Google provides a number of suggestions, but the most effective technique is to optimize content for the device requesting it.

For example, a website includes an 800kb JPEG image that is intended for high resolution desktops. On a smartphone, that would be optimized down to less than 100kb, with no perceptible impact on quality. LCP can improve by more than 60% — or several seconds — through this single optimization.

Find Savings in Largest Contentful Paint by using Image Speed Test

Image Speed Test is a great tool offered by ImageEngine.io that provides an analysis of LCP improvement opportunities. Just paste in the URL of the web page you are interested in optimizing, and the test will show you:

  • Image Payload Reduction
  • Speed Index
  • Largest Contentful Paint
  • Page Load Time (Visually Complete)

It also provides a video of the web page loading with and without optimizations. Finally, it analyses each image to provide an estimate of payload savings. In this case, the “largest content” on the page is this image. With optimizations, the image payload is reduced by 94%. That delivers a huge improvement in LCP.

How Does ImageEngine Improve LCP

ImageEngine is an image content delivery network (CDN) service that makes image optimization simple. Basically, for each image on the page, the image CDN will:

  1. Detect the device model requesting the web page;
  2. Optimize the image in terms of size, compression, image format;
  3. Deliver via a CDN edge server that is geographically closest to the user.

ImageEngine improves web performance for every image on the page, including the largest. You can learn more about ImageEngine here, and also sign up for a free trial.

Best Practices: Preconnect

In addition to using an image CDN like ImageEngine, a few other best practices can improve LCP. Using the resource hints to provide a preconnect for your content can streamline the download process.

For example, putting the following link statement in the HTML will accelerate the download process. The link statement will make the browser connect to the third party as early as possible so that download can start sooner. ImageEngine’s optimizations make each image download smaller and faster, but preconnect save time in the connection phase.

Best Practices: Minimize Blocking JavaScript and CSS

When JavaScript or CSS is “blocking” it means that the browser needs to parse and execute CSS and JavaScript in order to paint the final state of the page in the viewport.

Any website today relies heavily on both JavaScript and CSS, which means that it is almost impossible to avoid some render blocking resources. On a general note: be careful with what kind of CSS and JavaScript is referenced inside the <head> element. Make sure that only the strictly necessary resources are loaded in <head>. The rest can be deferred or loaded asynchronously.

When looking to improve the LCP specifically, there are some practices worth looking into more deeply.

Inline Critical CSS

It is not an easy task, but if the browser can avoid making a request to get the CSS needed to render the critical part of the page – usually the “above the fold” part – the LCP is likely to occur earlier. Also you will avoid content shifting around and maybe even a Flash of Unstyled Content (FOUC).

The critical CSS — the CSS needed by the browser to set up the structure and important styles of the part of the page shown above the fold — should in-inlined. This inlined CSS may also refer to background images, which of course should also be served by an Image CDN.

Do Not Use JavaScript to (lazy) Load Images

Many modern browsers natively support lazy loading, without the use of JavaScript. Because images usually are heavily involved in the performance of LCP, it is best practice to leave image loading to the browser and avoid adding JavaScript in order to lazy load images.

Lazy loading driven by JavaScript will add additional latency if the browser first has to load and parse JavaScript, then wait for it to execute, and then render images. This practice will also break the pre-parser in the browser.

If an image CDN is used to optimize images, then the benefits of lazy loading become much smaller. Especially large hero images that are above the fold have a large impact on LCP and will not benefit from being lazy loaded with JavaScript. It is best not to make JavaScript a blocking issue for rendering images, but rather rely on the browser’s own ability to select which images should be lazy loaded.

 

[– This is a sponsored post on behalf of ImageEngine –]

Source


Source de l’article sur Webdesignerdepot

La startup Aumenu choisit SAP Business One pour permettre aux restaurants de rouvrir leurs portes dans les meilleures conditions sanitaires

Née de la crise sanitaire, la jeune startup Bretonne Aumenu fait confiance à la solution SAP Business One pour se développer rapidement et proposer aux restaurateurs une alternative cloud au traditionnel menu papier. L’objectif : accompagner les restaurateurs pour les aider à respecter et appliquer des conditions sanitaires strictes et sans danger pour leurs clients.

Une solution en kit 100% cloud prête à l’emploi pour le restaurateur

Aumenu fournit un support physique et digital permettant de remplacer les cartes par un menu consultable sur smartphone via la lecture de QR codes pour éviter les risques de contamination. Ces codes sont présents sur des étiquettes autocollantes, adhésives, lavables et résistantes qui sont positionnées sur les tables des restaurants.

Le restaurateur choisit son kit en fonction du nombre d’espaces qu’il souhaite équiper puis active son compte lui donnant accès à sa plate-forme où il peut déposer ses fichiers pdf, word, powerpoint, excel pour mettre en ligne ses menus et accéder aux informations de ses clients. Avec 25% des utilisateurs qui laissent leurs e-mails en scannant le QR code, Aumenu, avec SAP Business One, permet aux restaurateurs d’acquérir et de constituer très rapidement une importante base de données. Cette dernière a un impact immédiat sur le business mais aussi sur la relation client.

Être opérationnelle dès l’ouverture des bars et des restaurants

Avec le plan de déconfinement progressif, la startup Aumenu avait pour enjeu principal d’être opérationnelle très rapidement et de pouvoir livrer partout en France. Elle souhaitait pour cela se munir d’une solution cloud complète qui lui permette de gérer toute son activité : CRM, prise de commande, facturation, production des menus digitaux, livraison etc. La solution devait également être capable de supporter la croissance de la startup, et notamment s’ouvrir à l’international.

Accompagné par W3COM, Aumenu a choisi SAP Business One, une solution cloud complète conçue spécifiquement pour les besoins des TPE/PME. Celle-ci centralise en effet dans un seul système toutes les activités de l’entreprise, leur permettant de gagner du temps et de booster leur croissance. Elle compte de nombreux avantages qui ont su répondre aux attentes de la startup : une personnalisation grâce à des solutions métiers adaptées à l’activité du client, une flexibilité et un accompagnement évolutif pour s’adapter à la croissance de la structure, une très grande simplicité d’utilisation pour une prise en main rapide et un accès à toutes ses informations en temps réel pour une grande réactivité et flexibilité.

SAP Business One pour s’étendre rapidement à l’international

La solution offre déjà plusieurs bénéfices à la startup. L‘évolutivité de la plateforme permet une production et un déploiement des étiquettes partout en France mais aussi dans le monde. Ainsi, Aumenu peut s’internationaliser très rapidement et facilement. Les données sont également collectées d’une façon très structurée et peuvent engendrer des effets de levier importants. Enfin, les services additionnels à valeur ajoutée pourront facilement être complétés à ces données et process existants.

Aujourd’hui, la startup doit s’adapter à la période de déconfinement et proposer aux restaurateurs une solution toujours plus satisfaisante et adéquate à la situation. Le challenge est de généraliser et de normaliser la solution d’Aumenu dans les 16 millions de restaurants à travers le monde.

« SAP Business One est au cœur du service fourni par notre startup. La solution nous a permis de nous développer en seulement 15 jours : un vrai record ! Il était évident qu’un tel projet devait s’appuyer sur un ERP solide, de bonne réputation avec l’agilité de son ouverture vers le web, la technologie HANA et l’accès en Hosted by SAP », explique Caroline Guerizec, cofondatrice de Aumenu.

The post La startup Aumenu choisit SAP Business One pour permettre aux restaurants de rouvrir leurs portes dans les meilleures conditions sanitaires appeared first on SAP France News.

Source de l’article sur sap.com

Des publicités en réalité augmentée sur Facebook

L’idée ? Proposer aux annonceurs de nouveaux outils pour contacter les utilisateurs du réseau social. Se maquiller, essayer une paire de lunettes, tester des nouveautés de décoration intérieure ; autant de possibilité que pourront exploiter les marques.
Source de l’article sur ZDNet

7 choses à savoir sur le partenariat entre Leica et Huawei

J’ai finalement appris tout ce que je voulais savoir sur le partenariat entre Leica et Huawei.
Source de l’article sur ZDNet

Samsung Knox vous aide à négocier le virage RGPD !

L’heure a sonné ! Le RGPD est entré en application et pourtant toutes les entreprises ne sont pas encore totalement prêtes ! Pour parer au plus pressé, il convient d’utiliser les solutions susceptibles de vous aider à vous mettre le plus vite possible en conformité.
Source de l’article sur ZDNet