Articles

This article is part of a series. For the previous article, see Moving an App Connect Flow Using MQ onto Containers. 

One of the most common integration points is a database, and App Connect is well suited to connecting to a significant variety of datastores. One of the most common protocols used to connect to databases is ODBC, so that is the example that we will work through in this post. 

Source de l’article sur DZONE


Introduction

Nestjs is a cutting-edge Node.js framework for developing server-side applications that are efficient, dependable, and scalable. It is simple to integrate with NoSQL and SQL databases such as MongoDB, Yugabyte, SQLite, Postgres, MySQL, and others. It supports popular object-relational mappers such as TypeORM Sequelize and Mongoose.

In this tutorial, we’ll create an e-commerce application with SQLite and TypeORM. We’ll also look at Arctype, a powerful SQL client and database management tool.

Source de l’article sur DZONE

Many software developers can attest that some of the most significant issues in their applications arise from database performance. Though many developers prefer to use a relational database for enterprise applications, typical logging and monitoring solutions provide limited signals to detect database performance issues. Rooting out common bad practices such as chatty interactions between the application code and the database is non-trivial.

As developers, we need to understand how our database is performing from the context of user transactions. Ideally, we would have a common tool that can monitor the performance of both the application and the database concerning user transactions. OpenTelemetry has emerged as a popular tool for application monitoring, but it can also be extended for monitoring databases.

Source de l’article sur DZONE

Infrastructure is one of the core tenets of a software development process — it is directly responsible for the stable operation of a software application. This infrastructure can range from servers, load balancers, firewalls, and databases all the way to complex container clusters.

Infrastructure considerations are valid beyond production environments, as they spread across the entire development process. They include tools and platforms such as CI/CD platforms, staging environments, and testing tools. These infrastructure considerations increase as the level of complexity of the software product increases. Very quickly, the traditional approach for manually managing infrastructure becomes an unscalable solution to meet the demands of DevOps modern rapid software development cycles. And that’s how Infrastructure as Code (IaC) has become the de facto solution in development today.

Source de l’article sur DZONE

Today, more than 100 billion searches are conducted every month on the Google search engine alone. Search engine users conduct searches for several reasons including the foundational conversion of information into action. An action could be a decision to purchase, consume information for decision-making, or seek a better understanding of an issue or topic among others. Search engines make information available at our fingertips right whenever we need it. 

In this era of big data, search solutions are useful not only for popular search engines like Google, Yahoo, and Bing but also for enterprises for monitoring and managing the growing volumes of data in their databases to enhance operational efficiency. The enterprise search industry has grown remarkably and is expected to be worth $8.90 billion by 2024.

Source de l’article sur DZONE


SQL is the only 22nd century tool available in 21st century

Here are the previous articles comparing architecture, database objects, data types, and data modeling of Oracle with Couchbase. This will focus on SQL support.  

Oracle was the first and staunch supporter of SQL. Oracle’s SQL implementation beat IBM to market by two years.  That changed the fortune of one or two people. :-) All of the modern relational databases implement SQL. So much so, the relational databases are sometimes called SQL databases, much to the chagrin of C. J. Date.  Nations are known by their languages… English, French, and American(!). It’s not a stretch for a class of database systems to be known by their languages as well.  SQL has been so effective, many big data and non-relational systems have picked up SQL as the lingua franca. SQL is here to stay, even for NoSQL systems. 

Source de l’article sur DZONE


Man on the computer.

Introduction

Relational databases distribute their data across many tables by normalization or according to business entities. This makes maintaining a growing database schema easier. Real-world queries often span across multiple tables, and hence joining these tables is inevitable.

PostgreSQL uses many algorithms to join tables. In this article, we will see how joins work behind the scenes from a planner perspective and understand how to optimize them.

Source de l’article sur DZONE

From intrusion detection to threat analysis to endpoint security, the effectiveness of cybersecurity efforts often boils down to how much data can be processed in real-time with the most advanced algorithms and models.

Many factors are obviously involved in stopping cybersecurity threats effectively. However, the databases responsible for processing the billions or trillions of events per day (from millions of endpoints) play a particularly crucial role. High throughput and low latency directly correlate with better insights as well as more threats discovered and mitigated in near real-time. Cybersecurity data-intensive systems are incredibly complex: many span 4+ data centers with database clusters exceeding 1000 nodes and petabytes of heterogeneous data under active management.

Source de l’article sur DZONE

Data is a piece or a large amount of information stored electronically. With so much information stored in different folders, this separation of data makes data storage inconsistent and tedious to access, edit, or replace.

That’s exactly where servers or databases come into the picture. With complex data and numbers pouring in on a daily basis, having a strong database or servers is crucial to managing it. A database is nothing but a collection of information in a structured way to allow for prompt readability, access, and editing. It is the center of the flow of data, as data flows from the database to other parts of the system.

Source de l’article sur DZONE

Article Image Life was normal until 2020’s monstrously bad news – Covid – came around. Developers got out of bed, then marched to the office to crunch code as they always do. While inside of the office, they reviewed their goals, played with Git, interacted with their colleagues over a cup (or two) of coffee, and built products relevant to the functionality of the company. Many developers also had side-projects that they would go home and work on during their free time as their hobby.

While in the office, developers would be busy regurgitating code – web developers, for example, would work with PHP, SQL, CSS, Javascript, and its libraries (say, jQuery). Meanwhile, database administrators would think deeply about the performance of their database instances (they would take care of indexing and normalizing their data, or work with big data sets, etc.). Once the code was complete, they’d document it and push it over to GitHub.

Source de l’article sur DZONE