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How to Get Dark Mode Design Right

Dark themes are everywhere these days. 

As human beings continue to spend more of their time interacting with technology, dark themes provide a more relaxing way to engage with the digital world. More often than not, these themes are easier on the eyes, more attractive, and perfect for the dedicated user

Throughout 2020, countless leading brands have debuted their own version of the dark theme. Google has a solution for your Drive, while Apple and Android have built dark theme performance right into their operating systems. 

If you haven’t learned how to make the most out of dark mode yet, then you could be missing out on an excellent opportunity to differentiate your design skills, and earn more clients going forward. 

Why Dark Mode?

Before we dive too deeply into the possibilities of creating your own dark theme, let’s examine what dark mode is, and why it’s so effective. 

Ultimately, dark themes are created to reduce the amount of luminance emitted by everything from your desktop and laptop, to your smartphone and smartwatch. Dark themes help to improve the visual ergonomics of design, by reducing eye strain, adjusting brightness to suit current lighting conditions, and more. Additionally, many dark mode offerings are also fantastic at conserving battery life. 

Here are some of the main benefits of adding dark themes to your design portfolio

  • Better user experience: A focus on user experience is one of the most important trends of the digital age. You need to be willing to deliver incredible experiences to everyone who visits your website if you want to stand out today. Dark mode reduces everything from eye strain, to battery power consumption. This helps to keep customers on a website for longer.
  • Innovation and cutting edge appeal: Most companies want to prove that they can stay on the cutting edge of their industry. The ability to offer an opt-in dark mode version of a website theme or appearance can help your clients to stand out from the crowd. As the environment becomes more mobile-focused, more companies will be looking for designers that can provide the best mobile experiences. 
  • Support for universal design: Dark mode isn’t just great for people who have light sensitivity at night. This solution could be more comfortable for visually-impaired users who would struggle with eye strain when visiting your websites otherwise. If you want your content to be more inclusive for a wider range of viewers, then learning how to design for dark mode is a good way to start.

Best Practices When Designing for Dark Mode

Designing for dark mode is easier than you’d think. Most of the time, it involves simply thinking about how you can replace some of the brighter, more overwhelming aspects of your site, with something deeper and darker. 

Here are some useful tips that will get you moving in the right direction. 

1. Experiment with Colors

A big issue for a lot of web designers when it comes to developing a dark mode solution is that they get too caught up with things like pure white text against pure black backgrounds. However, this high-contrast option can be a little much after a while. 

It’s often much easier to use a dark grey as your primary surface color, instead of a true black. Additionally, rather than using bright white, think about slightly off-white alternatives that will be warmer to the eye.

Experiment with surfaces and color combinations that are unlikely to cause too much eye strain. Dark grey foundations often offer a wider range of depth, too, because you can demonstrate shadows on grey. 

Additionally, when you are experimenting with colors, remember that saturated colors often vibrate painfully against very dark surfaces, making them harder to read. Desaturating your colors will help to reduce the contrast and make your websites more welcoming. 

Lighter tones in the 200-50 range will have better readability on dark themes. However, you can always experiment with your choices. Google Material Design recommends using a contrast level of around 15:8:1 between your background and text. 

2. Consider the Emotional Impact

Much of the effort involved with dark mode design is figuring out how certain colors work together. It’s easy to get carried away with stark contrasts, particularly when you’re used to working with a white background. However, you need to remember that you’re designing for a user that’s primarily looking for an easier and more subdued browsing experience.

While you’re working, remember to consider the emotional aspect of the design too. The emotion in colors can make or break a buyer’s journey in any environment. However, an often overlooked-aspect of color psychology, is that people perceive shades differently when they’re on a black background

For instance, think of the color green. On a light background, it conveys nature and even financial wealth. However, on a dark background, the same green could come across as something venomous, toxic, or even sickly. It’s important to think about the kind of impressions end users are going to get when they arrive on your site.

3. Give Users the Freedom to Choose

One of the biggest mistakes you can make when you begin designing for dark mode, is thinking that you should focus entirely on your dark themes, and nothing else. This lines you up for a problem if you interact with users who want the best of both worlds. If you’re designing for apps in particular, you’re going to need web pages that can switch naturally between light and dark themes. 

Learning how to implement both a dark mode and a light mode option into the desks you create will help you to reach a wider selection of customers. Remember, you’ll need to test the performance and impact of your designs in both themes, to check that they deliver the same kind of experience, no matter how your user chooses to browse. 

Although dark mode should offer a different experience to end-users, it still needs to feel as though they’re browsing on the same website. That means that you’re going to need to experiment with the most natural combination of light and dark mode options.

4. Remember the Basics

Remember, although the three tips above will help you to get on the right path for dark mode design, you’ll also need to consider the opportunities and limitations of the platforms that you’re designing for. The kind of dark mode experience you can deliver for Google Chrome websites is going to be very different to what you can create for something running on iOS.

Examining the documentation provided by the system that you’re designing for will help you to develop something with a close insight into what’s actually possible. 

Other top tips for dark mode design include:

  • Focus on your content: Make sure that your content stands out on the page, without being too overwhelming. 
  • Test your design: In both light and dark appearances, you need to make sure everything is working as it should be.
  • Adopt vibrancy for your interfaces: Vibrancy helps to improve the contrast between your background and foreground. 
  • Use semantic colors: Semantic colors adapt to the current appearance of a website automatically. Hard-coded color values that don’t adapt can seem more aggressive. 
  • Desktop tinting: Try experiment with things like transparency and filters to give your websites and apps a slightly warmer tint – ideal for late-night browsing
  • Icons: Use individual glyphs and icons for dark and light modes if necessary. 

Ready to Design for Dark Mode?

Preparing your web development and design portfolio for an era addicted to dark mode can be a complex experience. You need to think carefully about how people are going to browse through your websites and apps when they’re searching for something more subtle, and less visually overwhelming than the websites that we’re used to making. 

The most important thing to remember is that everything on your website or application should look just as beautifully tailor-made in dark mode as it does in light mode. Simply adding a dynamic black background when people want to switch settings in an app isn’t enough. You need to go in-depth with your designs and examine how different fonts, colors, and images work together.

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Source de l’article sur Webdesignerdepot

Branding 101: Choosing the Right Business Name

When starting a new business (or even venturing into the world of freelancing for the first time), there are some really big, important steps you have to take.

Step #1 is choosing the right business name for your brand identity.

Your business name isn’t something you can casually choose either — especially if you have lofty long-term goals for your company. It’s not as though you can’t change the name down the road, but that comes with a ton of work and will require you to rebuild pretty much everything all over again: your visual brand identity, your reputation, and your SEO…

So, it’s a good idea to spend time choosing a business name that’s going to work for you now and long into the future.

Today, we’re going to go through the process of how to name your brand. These questions will have you thinking beyond just “What name do I like the sound of?” and have you more focused on important questions like “What is my unique value proposition?”.

Let’s get started:

How to Name Your New Business

For those of you considering taking the easy way out and using a business name generator tool, let me show you why that’s a bad idea:

This is a list of business names suggested to me when I told the generator that my business is related to “design”:

  • Design
  • Normal Design
  • Regional Design
  • Design Partner
  • Design Stock

Even the more unique names on the list are unusable; they have no connection to me personally or to the kind of business I plan to start.

This is why it’s so important to sort out your brand identity and make sure you pick a business name that resonates with you, and your target audience. To do this yourself, answer the following seven questions:

1. What Services Will You Provide Or Products Will You Sell?

The one thing that name generators get right is including a descriptive word related to your business. That way, it doesn’t take an actual visit to your website or a look through your portfolio to figure out what you do.

Even if you have a very niche specialty, sum up your offering in one or two words. For instance:

  • Web design
  • Digital design
  • Design & development
  • UX design
  • Graphic design

Unless you run your business through your own name (which I’ll talk about shortly), your business name should include a simplified version of your offering in it.

2. Who Is Your Target User Persona?

A user persona is a fictional character created using the demographics and psychology of your ideal customer or client. You can use Hubspot’s Make My Persona generator to create a card that documents these details:

Once you sort out who you serve, what makes them tick, and how it fits into the bigger picture of their business, you can better pitch your solution to them.

For instance, Joanna above is a real estate agent and owner whose primary goal is to capture leads and generate sales. You know how effective a real estate website can be for improving an agent’s visibility online and streamlining how they earn money.

So, including words in your business name that speak to that persona as well as their goals might be really useful.

Just keep in mind that web designers don’t always commit to one niche or stick with the same niche over the long run. So, you might not want to make your business name too specific to an industry (e.g. “Real Estate Design Solutions”) and more related to higher level themes and goals.

3. What Are The Names Of Your Top Competitors?

Do you know who your main competitors will be upon entering this space? If not, now’s the time to look them up.

When it comes to business names, you want to see if you can identify common threads among them. Perhaps they use puns or include location-specific descriptors. Or they just stick with the names they were born with.

While you don’t want to come off as a copycat, you can imbue your business name with a similar theme or tone if it’s proven to be successful with your shared audience. 

4. What Makes You Different?

Every business has a unique value proposition (UVP) — something that sets them apart from everyone else in the space. What’s yours?

Do you operate within a large metropolitan area where your prospective clients’ industry is booming?

Did you previously work in the industry for which you now build websites?

Are you an SEO expert who builds enterprise websites that rank?

In business, it’s good to be different — so long as it benefits your clients.

If you have a particular UVP that’s going to make you stand out, you’re going to use it everywhere to market yourself — your website, social media, sales pitches, etc. So, you might want to consider using a unique keyword from it within your business name.

5. Where Do You Envision Yourself In Five Years?

No one’s future is set in stone. However, if you’re seriously thinking about starting a new web design business, you have some ideas about where you want to go with it:

  • Do you like the idea of being a lifelong freelancer or digital nomad?
  • Would you like to operate your own design agency?
  • Do you have aspirations to build and sell website products, like plugins, themes, or UI kits instead?

If you expect to pivot your business at some point, be careful about choosing a business name that paints you into a corner. Keep it broader so that prospects don’t have to wonder what it is you really do.

And if you plan on scaling your business beyond yourself, using your own name might not be the best idea. You’ll want clients to associate the brand name with your agency, not with you specifically.

6. Will Your Business Name Be Easy To Remember?

At this point, you have some business names brewing. So, now we need to look at the more technical aspects of naming your brand.

Here’s what you need to do.

a. Write down no more than three to five business names you like.

For example:

  • Honeymooners Web Design
  • Charles Murphy Design & Development
  • FoREver Websites
  • SOLD Web Design Agency

b. Mash each name into one long lowercase string. Don’t include any punctuation.

For example:

  • honeymoonerswebdesign
  • charlesmurphydesignanddevelopment
  • foreverwebsites
  • soldwebdesignagency

c. Are any of the names difficult to read? Too long? Do any of them cause confusion and look like they mean something else?

If so, get rid of them as a matching domain name won’t work. Or, if you absolutely love them, fix the name so it’s clear, readable, and short. For instance:

charlesmurphydesignanddevelopment becomes charlesmurphydesign or just charlesmurphy.

7. Does The Name You Want Already Exist?

It’s a good idea to have a backup name in case you discover that the name you want already exists. Due to trademarking issues as well as possible confusion for your clients, you’ll want to avoid using a name that overlaps with or is the same as any other company (in or outside of web design).

Do a Google search for the business name you want to use. Check out the top 10 search results to see if there are any other matches.

You’ll also want to test out the domain name. Go to Domain.com and run your business name string through it:

You have a few options if this happens:

  1. Choose a different top-level domain (e.g. .tech, .io, .design).
  2. Use an abbreviated version of your business name  (e.g. solddesignagency.com).
  3. Move your backup business name to the front of the line and see if it’s available.

It all depends on how attached you are to the business name you’ve chosen. Just make sure that any changes you make to it (like shortening the domain name or using an alternate TLD) doesn’t cause confusion for prospects who look you up online. You don’t want them confusing someone else’s domain name for yours if business name and domain name don’t line up.

Choosing a Business Name Is Just the First Step…

Once you’ve settled on your business name, share it with a few people you trust. They’ll let you know if you’ve totally missed the mark or if it’s something you should be excited to run with.

As soon as you’re 100% sure it’s the right name, buy the domain name and register your company. Then, it’ll be official!

Of course, this isn’t the end to branding your new business. In our next Branding 101 post, we’re going to look at the next step: How to create the visual identity for your business.

Stay tuned!

 

Featured image via Pexels.

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Source de l’article sur Webdesignerdepot

Exciting New Tools for Designers, October 2020

This month’s collection of new tools, resources, and freebies for designers is a smorgasbord of sorts. You’ll find everything from useful APIs to icons to tutorials to fonts.

Let’s get right into it, here’s what new for designers this month:

Tooltip Sequence

Now that your app or website is ready, you might need to help users engage with it. Tooltip Sequence is a simple JavaScript package that helps you create a series of small tooltips that will guide users through product features with a small description of what they need to know. It looks great and the best part is this tool saves you from having to create each tooltip description manually on each page and link them together.

Serenade

Serenade allows you to free up your hands with voice coding technology. Use natural speech and stay productive with this tool that allows you to code without typing. It works across multiple coding languages and platforms. It’s as easy as “add function hello” and the tool knows what syntax to use.

Gazepass

Gazepass, which is still in beta, is a nifty API that allows for passwordless multi-factor authentication for any website or mobile app. It uses biometrics on any device or platform to make getting into apps or websites easier for users.

Filters.css

Filters.css is a CSS-only library to apply color filters to website images. Installation only takes three steps and includes a variety of filers, such as blur, grayscale, brightness, contrast, invert, saturate, sepia, and opacity.

Sidebar Webring

Sidebar Webring is a collection of blogs and websites that are focused on web design. The curated list is handpicked for superb content for designers and developers. But, what’s a webring? It’s a collection of linked websites in a circular structure that are organized around a theme. The term is a throwback to the early days of the web in the 1990s and 2000s.

Wicked Templates

Wicked Templates is a set of responsive HTML templates made with Bulma and Tailwind CSS that you can style and use as you wish. Use these templates to jumpstart projects. Free and paid options available.

WP Umbrella

WP Umbrella will help you keep sites running in a healthy and safe manner on WordPress. Monitor uptime and performance, PHP errors, and keep up with hundreds of websites from one dashboard.

Servicebot

Servicebot helps you create customer-facing embeddable billing pages that work with Stripe payments. This premium tool is quite user-friendly and works with websites or SaaS.

Custom, Accessible Checkboxes with Perfect Alignment

Create custom, accessible checkboxes with perfect alignment every time. This walkthrough shows you how to use CSS to align elements and labels.

Sombras.app

Sombras.app is a nifty tool that creates 3D object shadows. Use the easy on-screen controls to get just the right orientation and shape.

urlcat

Urlcat is a tiny JavaScript library that helps you build URLs with dynamic parameters and without mistakes. The friendly API has no dependencies, includes TypeScript types, and is just 0.8KB minified and gzipped.

Reacher

Reacher is a real-time email verification API that lets you check the validity of an address before you send the email. Reduce bounce rates in an instant. (The personal version is free.)

Swell

Swell is a most powerful headless ecommerce platform for modern brands, startups, and agencies. Create fast and flexible shopping experiences with the API and headless storefront themes. This is a premium tool but does have a free trial.

No Code Founders 2.0

No Code Founders 2.0 is a platform for discovering the latest startups built with no-code and the tools used to build them. Browse startups, tools, perks, interviews, jobs, meetups, posts, and more as part of the no-code movement. The community engages on Slack and requires an email to sign up.

How to Pick More Beautiful Colors for Your Data Visualizations

Beautiful color choices will make your data visualizations that much more impactful. This tutorial by Lisa Charlotte Rost will help you make better color choices on the way to better infographics and charts. Plus, it’s well developed, designed, and packed with useful information.

IconPark

IconPark is a collection of more than 1,200 high-quality icons with an interface that allows you to customize them. It uses a single SVG source file that can be transformed into multiple themes. The library includes cross-platform components and is free to use.

Mono Icons

Mono Icons is a simple and consistent open-source icon set that uses mono spacing. The collection includes 136 icons.

BGJar

BGJar is a free SVG background generator for digital projects. Pick a category and customize the result to fit your project or needs.

HitCount

HitCount is almost too simple to be true. This tiny tool lets you add a hit counter to your website that’s as easy as adding an image. Copy the code and make any customizations you want. Then paste it to your design. That’s it!

Blacklight

Blacklight is a real-time website privacy inspector. The tool by Surya Mattu scans any website you enter in the scan bar and shows what user-tracking technologies are used on the website. This allows you to see who might be gathering data about your visit.

Alter

Alter is a customizable – and experimental – three-dimensional typeface that you can experiment with. It’s as fun to play with as use.

Autobus Omnibus

Autobus Omnibus is a simple all capitals font with new wave styling. The character set has 96 glyphs that are perfect for display use.

Deathmatch

Deathmatch is a seasonal blackletter font that’s ideal for the upcoming Halloween holiday. The character set includes plenty of options and there’s a full version (paid) for commercial use.

Futura Now

Futura Now is a premium typeface and update to a font you may already know and love. The new version has 107 styles in a massive family.

Pumpkin Soup

Pumpkin Soup is a fun almost handwriting style typeface with a cartoonish vibe. It includes a regular and italic style and is most appropriate in limited use.

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Source de l’article sur Webdesignerdepot

Devenir résilient avec un ERP Intelligent : les six ingrédients pour construire votre business case SAP S/4HANA

Stephen Hawking a défini l’intelligence comme « la capacité à s’adapter au changement ». En ce sens, 2020 peut être vu comme un test de QI géant pour les entreprises. La pandémie mondiale, le Brexit, les attentes croissantes des clients, la hausse des cyberattaques, la volatilité de l’activité et les exigences de conformité du XXIe siècle ne sont que quelques-uns des changements que les organisations doivent savoir intégrer intelligemment – non seulement maintenant, mais aussi sur le long terme.

La résilience est désormais associée à la survie des entreprises. Selon McKinsey, « votre contexte commercial est et restera incertain. Mais si vous bougez maintenant, vous pourrez surfer sur les vagues d’incertitude au lieu d’être maîtrisé par elles. »

Nous partageons cette analyse. Mais nous ne pensons pas que vous devriez avoir à tout gérer par vous-même. Lors du confinement, la réponse de SAP a consisté à aider ses clients. Nous offrons maintenant des ressources pour aider les entreprises à revenir à leur meilleur niveau.

SAP aide les organisations à être mieux gérées en devenant des entreprises intelligentes. Une démarche dont le cœur est l’ERP Intelligent SAP S/4HANA. C’est pourquoi nous avons créé un programme pour aider les entreprises à basculer vers SAP S/4HANA.

Comme l’explique Christian Klein, CEO de SAP : « plus qu’une transformation technologique, le passage à SAP S/4HANA est une véritable transformation métier. » C’est pourquoi nous vous proposons de vous aider à rédiger votre business case de migration en vous faisant découvrir les capacités intelligentes qui apporteront de la résilience à votre organisation. Nous vous aidons à mener votre projet à bien en utilisant notre expertise, nos outils spécialisés et nos partenaires. Le tout en tant qu’équipe unie : vous, nous et notre écosystème. Nous vous assistons également tout au long de votre projet, en vous accompagnant à chaque étape.

Comment ? Grâce à notre Digital Forum en trois parties : « Construire la résilience avec un ERP intelligent ». Cet événement prépare le terrain en apportant des conseils, des réponses aux questions courantes, des ressources, des outils, des informations et des éléments concernant le temps nécessaire pour construire un business case qui transformera tous les domaines de votre organisation, de la finance à la supply chain et l’informatique, en passant par les ventes et le marketing.

Les 20, 21 et 22 octobre de 10h00 à 11h30, nous vous livrerons les six ingrédients clés qui vous aideront à construire votre business case SAP S/4HANA, notamment :

  1. Des retours en live de la part d’experts SAP
  2. Des orientations métiers
  3. Des présentations client significatives
  4. Des conseils en provenance de nos partenaires les plus expérimentés
  5. Du chat et des sessions dédiées aux spécialistes
  6. Des questions-réponses et des téléchargements sur notre Digital Hub

Des clients tels que Vodafone, Naturipe Farms ou Enexis expliquent comment ils ont construit leurs propres business cases spécifiques et quel support s’est révélé déterminant. Ils livrent leurs expériences et conseils, afin de vous permettre de viser résilience et intelligence. Des partenaires tels que Deloitte, Capgemini et Delaware partagent leurs idées, expertise et conseils afin d’aider des organisations comme la vôtre à devenir des entreprises intelligentes.

Et parce que nous voulons que vous fassiez l’expérience de la première suite ERP Intelligente au monde, nous avons créé un jeu de simulation en temps réel, qui vous permettra d’acquérir une expérience pratique de SAP S/4HANA, les après-midi des 20 et 21 octobre. Cette expérience divertissante et ludique permettra à des groupes de joueurs de se mesurer entre eux, dans le cadre de décisions clés et de transactions dans la planification, les ventes, le marketing, les achats, la production, les finances et plus encore. Tout ceci dans un environnement métier fidèle à la réalité. Préparez-vous à gagner et adoptez ce jeu de simulation en prélude à votre passage à SAP S/4HANA.

Nous savons que chaque organisation est à une étape différente de son parcours, avec ses propres spécificités. C’est la raison pour laquelle nos « champions SAP S/4HANA » régionaux fournissent un support au cas par cas, vous montrant comment et par où commencer, en vous aidant à rédiger un business case pour votre organisation.

Que vous soyez une grande multinationale ou une petite entreprise, nos capacités et processus spécifiques à l’industrie, nos traitements en temps réel et notre automatisation intelligente de pointe vous permettent de vous adapter et d’évoluer avec confiance, agilité et résilience.

Les anciens systèmes ERP sont confortables et fonctionnels, mais ils ne vous mettront pas sur un pied d’égalité avec des concurrents qui ont pris en compte de nouvelles attentes client dépassant votre portée organisationnelle. La résilience des entreprises nécessite plus qu’une simple transformation du cœur technologique. Elle requiert une véritable transformation vers une entreprise intelligente. Transformation qui s’étend à tous les domaines de l’organisation.

En moyenne, les clients SAP S/4HANA constatent des gains métiers significatifs et transformateurs, comme :

  • Une augmentation des ventes de 30 % ;
  • Un coût total de possession réduit de 20 % ;
  • Une réduction des retours sous garantie de 40 % ;
  • Une réduction des coûts d’inventaire et des défauts de 20 % ;
  • Une augmentation de la vitesse de génération des rapports de 30 % ;
  • Une réduction de 50 % du temps passé sur la clôture d’exercice ;
  • Une création de devis 60 fois plus rapide.

Vous trouverez d’autres ingrédients pour votre business case sur le SAP S/4HANA Digital Forum : « Construisez la résilience avec un ERP intelligent ». Démarrez votre business case SAP S/4HANA. On se voit là-bas ! Inscription.

The post Devenir résilient avec un ERP Intelligent : les six ingrédients pour construire votre business case SAP S/4HANA appeared first on SAP France News.

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The Ultimate 10 UX Influencers to Follow

The digital world is a place of constant change. Just as you get used to a new design trend, another one appears, forcing you to rethink the way that you approach each client project. 

As a web designer, it’s up to you to make sure that you have your finger on the pulse on the latest transformations in the industry. However, it can be challenging to know for sure which trends you should be taking seriously, and which you can simply ignore. 

One option to refine and enhance your design journey is to pay attention to influencers. 

Influencers aren’t just there to guide customers into making purchasing decisions. These people are thought-leaders in their field. They spend all of their time tracking down ideas and concepts that really work. That way, they can maintain a successful reputation online.

Sourcing information and motivation from the following UX influencers could help you to create some truly amazing websites in 2020: 

1. Andrew Kucheriavy 

Andrew Kucheriavy is the phenomenal co-founder and CEO of a company named Intechnic. Andrew was one of the first people in the world to be given the “Master in User Experience” award. This means that he’s an excellent person to pay attention to if you want help understanding the ins and outs of user experience design

As one of the leading visionaries in UX, business strategy, and inbound marketing, Andrew has a lot of useful information to offer professionals and learners alike. Andrew is particularly active on Twitter, where he’s constantly sharing insights on design and marketing. You can also find input from Andrew on the Intechnic blog. 

2. Jeff Veen 

Another must-follow for designers who want to learn more about understanding their audience and their position in the marketplace, Jeff Veen is a leader in UX and product design. Veen got his start with the founding team for Wired, before he created the Adaptive Path company for UX consulting. Jeff Veen is also known for being responsible for various aspects of Google Analytics. 

Over the years, Jeff has expanded his knowledge in the design space, and mentored various companies, from WordPress to Medium. He also has a fantastic podcast that you can listen to for guidance when you’re on the go. 

3. Jared Spool 

Jared Spool has been tackling the most common issues of user experience since before the term “UX” was even a thing. Excelling in the design world since 1978, Jared has become one of the biggest and most recognizable names in the user experience environment. He’s the founder of the User Interface Engineering consulting firm. The company concentrates on helping companies to improve their site and product usability. 

Jared offers plenty of handy information to stock up on in his Twitter feed. Additionally, you can find plenty of helpful links to blogs and articles that he has published around the web on Twitter too. He’s followed by Hubgets, PICUS, and many other leading brands. Make sure that you check out his collection of industry-leading talks on UIE. 

4. Jen Romano Bergstrom

An experimental psychologist, User Experience Research coach, and UX specialist, Jen is one of the most impressive women in the web design world. She helped to create the unique experiences that customers can access on Instagram and Facebook. Additionally, she has a specialist knowledge of eye-tracking on the web. You can even check out Jen’s books on eye-tracking and usability testing

When she’s not writing books or researching user experience, Jen is blogging and tweeting about usability and researching new strategies in the web design space. It’s definitely worth keeping up with Jen on Twitter, particularly if you want to be the first to know about her upcoming seminars and learning sessions. 

5. Katie Dill 

Katie Dill is the former Director of Experience for Airbnb, so you know that she knows her way around some unique experiences. With an expertise in working with companies that harness new technologies and UX design, Katie Dill is at the forefront of the user experience landscape. Dill attends various UX conferences throughout the year, and publishes a range of fantastic videos on YouTube. 

You can find blogs and articles from Katie published on the web; however, you’ll be able to get the most input from her by following Katie on her Twitter account. 

6. Khoi Vinh 

Khoi Vinh is one of the most friendly and unique UX bloggers and influencers on the market today. He knows how to talk to people in a way that’s interesting and engaging – even about more complicated topics in UX design. Vinh is a principle designer at Adobe, and he has his own podcast called Wireframe. However, he still finds time to keep his followers engaged on Twitter. 

Over the years, Khoi has worked as a Design Director for Etsy and the New York Times. Vinh also wrote a book called “Ordering Disorder” which examines grid principles in web design. According to Fast Company, he’s one of the most influential designers in America. Additionally, Khoi has a brilliant blog where you can check out all of his latest insights into UX design. 

7. Cory Lebson

Cory Lebson is a veteran in the world of web design and user experience. With more than 2 decades of experience in the landscape, Cory has his own dedicated UX consulting firm named Lebsontech. Lebson and his company concentrate on offering UX training, mentoring, and user experience strategy support to customers. Cory also regularly speaks on topics regarding UX career development, user experience, information architecture and more. 

Cory is an excellent influencer to follow on Twitter, where you’ll find him sharing various UX tricks and tips. You can also check out Cory’s handbook on UX careers, or find him publishing content on the Lebsontech blog too. 

8. Lizzie Dyson

Another amazing woman in the industry of UX, Lizzie Dyson is changing the experience landscape as we know it. Although she’s a relatively new figure in the web design world, she’s recognized world-wide for her amazing insights into the world of web development. Lizzie also helped to create a new group specifically for women that want to get involved in web design. 

The Ladies that UX monthly meet-up welcomes a community of women into the digital landscape, helping them to learn and expand their skills. Lizzie regularly publishes content online as part of Ladies that UX. Additionally, she appears on the Talk UX feed – an annual design and tech conference held for women around the world. 

9. Chris Messina 

Chris Messina is a product designer and a technical master who understands what it takes to avoid disappointing your users. With more than a decade of experience in the UX design landscape, Messina has worked for a variety of big-name brands, including Google and Uber. He is best known as the inventor of the hashtag!

Chris is a highly skilled individual who understands the unique elements that engage customers and keep people coming back for more on a website. You can see Chris speaking at a selection of leading conferences around the world. Check out some of his talks on YouTube or track down his schedule of upcoming talks here. Chris also has a variety of fantastic articles on Medium to read too. 

10. Elizabeth Churchill

Last, but definitely not least, Elizabeth Churchill is a UX leader with an outstanding background in psychology, research science, psychology, artificial intelligence, cognitive science, human interaction with computers and more. She knows her way around everything from cognitive economics, to everyday web design. Churchill also acts as the director of UX for Google Material Design. 

A powerhouse of innovation and information, Churchill has more than 50 patents to her name. She’s also the vice president of the Association for Computing Machinery too. When she’s not sharing information on Twitter, Elizabeth also has a regular column that you can tune into on the ACM Interactions magazine. 

Who Are You Following in 2020?

Whether you’re looking for inspiration, guidance, or information, the right influencers can deliver some excellent insights into the world of web design. There are plenty of thought leaders out there in the realm of user experience that can transform the way that you approach your client projects. You might even discover a new favourite podcast to listen to, or an amazing series of videos that help you to harness new talents. 

Influencers are more than just tools for digital marketing; they’re an excellent source of guidance for growing UX designers too.

 

Featured image via Pexels.

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Faire de l’expérience client un avantage concurrentiel

Les clients accordent de plus en plus d’importance à l’expérience qu’ils reçoivent plutôt qu’au prix ou au produit. C’est pourquoi l’expérience client est rapidement devenue une priorité absolue pour toutes les entreprises. En 2020, avec les livraisons à domicile et les mesures de distanciation sociale mises en place en réponse à la COVID-19, les consommateurs sont passés à la commande sur smartphone pour acheter de tout, de la soupe aux noix.

De plus en plus de personnes utilisent des applications mobiles pour faire venir de la nourriture à leur porte. Les consommateurs savent à quel point il est important d’utiliser ces applications, que ce soit dans le confort de leur propre maison ou sur le trajet domicile-travail. Avec des options de personnalisation pour enregistrer leurs préférences, des informations précises sur les prix et des offres à portée de main, les attentes des consommateurs en matière de rapidité et d’absence de friction pour passer leurs commandes n’ont jamais été aussi grandes.

Bien entendu, pour pouvoir offrir une excellente expérience au client à ce niveau, il faut investir dans des technologies et des processus intelligents.

Renforcer les capacités du commerce électronique

Ce n’est pas seulement un dépanneur et un détaillant de carburant typique, mais Casey’s General Stores Inc. (Casey’s) est la cinquième plus grande chaîne de pizzas d’Amérique, avec plus de 19 millions de pizzas servies chaque année. En développant des liens communautaires solides, la marque est intégrée au tissu des petites villes du Midwest, offrant un service de proximité 24 heures sur 24, soutenant des causes importantes et célébrant les héros locaux.

Si la marque a su gagner des adeptes, Casey’s devait faire plus avec ses systèmes de commande et de paiement en ligne. Ils ont été construits sur des logiciels vieillissants qui n’ont pas su suivre le rythme de l’époque, ce qui a eu pour conséquence une expérience client en ligne qui n’était pas à la hauteur de l’essence de la marque, hyper pratique et axée sur la communauté.

Ainsi, dans le cadre de sa transformation numérique, il était non seulement essentiel pour Casey’s de renforcer ses capacités en matière de commerce électronique, mais il lui fallait aussi mettre l’expérience du client au premier plan et répondre plus rapidement aux changements du marché.

Pour ce faire, elle a dû utiliser des technologies intelligentes pour créer une application pratique pour smartphone et un site Web mobile afin de rationaliser les commandes par téléphone portable, ce qui a permis aux habitants de ces villes du Midwest de prendre leurs pizzas préférées très facilement et rapidement. En même temps, dans le but de l’aider à atteindre de nouveaux niveaux de confort, Casey’s a conçu un programme de fidélisation des clients.

citation de Art Sebastian, VP de Casey's

Rationalisation des processus de commande et de paiement

Pour rationaliser le processus de commande et de paiement en permettant aux clients de payer en ligne, Casey’s a déployé les solutions SAP Commerce Cloud et SAP Customer Data Cloud du portefeuille SAP Customer Experience. L’application mobile permet aux clients de passer des commandes de ramassage ou de livraison, de définir une carte de crédit par défaut pour le paiement, de personnaliser les commandes de pizza, de trouver un magasin, de parcourir le menu, de suivre les commandes, de réorganiser les favoris et de vérifier le prix du carburant.

Dans les cinq mois qui ont suivi son lancement, Casey’s a généré environ 65 % de ses revenus numériques grâce à l’application et 30 % supplémentaires grâce au Web mobile.

En lançant son premier programme de fidélité numérique, Casey’s Rewards, sur SAP Customer Data Cloud, Casey’s a organisé les données, le consentement et les préférences des clients et les a reliés directement à ses applications sur SAP Commerce Cloud. D’un seul coup, Casey’s est en mesure de récompenser sa légion de fans avec des offres à valeur ajoutée, tout en l’aidant à mieux connaître leurs besoins – ce qui lui permet en fin de compte de proposer des expériences qui dépassent ces besoins.

Une évolution rapide à l’époque de COVID-19

L’investissement de Casey dans les technologies intelligentes a également permis à ses magasins de rester ouverts pendant la période de COVID-19 et à l’entreprise d’avancer plus rapidement que jamais. Pour répondre aux attentes des clients pendant cette période, Casey’s a donné la priorité aux livraisons sans contact, s’est associé à un service de livraison tiers, a élargi la gamme de produits de marchandises générales disponibles en ligne et a lancé un service de livraison en bordure de trottoir.

Pour en savoir plus sur la transformation numérique de Casey’s, nous avons rencontré Art Sebastian, vice-président de Digital Guest Experience chez Casey’s à SAPPHIRE NOW Converge. Dans cette interview de quatre minutes, il décrit comment le détaillant de la supérette a fait de l’expérience client un avantage concurrentiel. Pour en savoir plus, consultez l’étude sur la transformation de l’entreprise, « Casey’s : Building True Customer Loyalty Over Pizza ».

Article publié en anglais sur blogs.sap.com

 

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Source de l’article sur sap.com

SAP accélère sur sa plateforme collaborative : SAP Logistics Business Network – offrant plus de visibilité et de traçabilité des livraisons et un écosystème partenaire étendu

Levallois – 8 octobre 2020 – SAP SE (NYSE : SAP) annonce une nouvelle version de SAP® Logistics Business Network, qui apporte de nouvelles capacités dans la gestion du réseaux des partenaires logistiques en termes de visibilité, de collaboration et intègre de nouveaux partenaires à sa plateforme logistique.

SAP Logistics Business Network est une plateforme cloud de business network dédiée à la logistique, conçue pour permettre aux clients SAP de connecter leur système d’information à leur réseau de partenaires pour étendre le suivi livraison des commandes et assurer la traçabilité des produits.

« Comme preuve supplémentaire de l’engagement de SAP, annoncé lors de SAPPHIRE NOW®, de proposer une offre complète de business networks : SAP Business Network, nous continuons d’ajouter de nouvelles capacités et d’étendre nos partenariats sur SAP Logistics Business Network notre business network dédié à la logistique », a déclaré Paige Cox, vice-président senior de SAP et responsable du SAP Business Network. « Les APIs ouvertes et les partenariats élargis sont des preuves de notre stratégie visant à créer un véritable réseau des réseaux. »

Cette nouvelle version constitue la prochaine étape de notre stratégie visant à permettre une visibilité de bout en bout, une efficacité accrue de la logistique et une collaboration transparente grâce à un réseau d’entreprises unifié qui inclut :

  • La visibilité sur l’exécution des commandes client grâce au suivi et à la traçabilité de nouvelle génération intégrée à SAP Logistics Business Network. Notre business network permet un suivi des étapes de livraison en temps réel pour tous les modes de transport offrant ainsi une couverture mondiale.
  • Des capacités de collaboration transport étendues, notamment le suivi multimodal des ordres de fret qui accroît la visibilité sur les événements routiers et maritimes.
  • Des APIs standards pour connecter les partenaires et les plateformes de fret, permettant de nouvelles collaborations entre partenaires routiers et maritimes.

SAP Logistics Business Network étend la couverture de différents modes de transport grâce à des partenaires nouveaux et existants, tels que :

  • project44, offrant une connectivité B2B pour la contractualisation transport, et des fonctions de visibilité pour le suivi en temps réel des envois routiers et le suivi des transports maritimes.
  • ClearMetal, permettant le suivi des conteneurs et des expéditions en transit grâce au Machine Learning reposant sur le référencement croisé des informations afin de faciliter le suivi maritime.
  • Shippeo, spécialiste du marché européen, offrant aux chargeurs un accès à son réseau de transporteurs, à son expertise en matière de réglementation et aux données de télémétrie de millions de camions pour un suivi des expéditions routières en temps réel.

« Grâce à ces partenariats, les entreprises utilisatrices de SAP Logistics Business Network peuvent désormais accéder tout au long du transport terrestre et maritime à la localisation exacte, aux changements de statuts et à l’heure d’arrivée estimée (ETA) de leurs expéditions. La nouvelle connectivité avec les transporteurs maritimes et les ports, ainsi qu’avec les systèmes satellitaires, apporte une visibilité sur l’ensemble du fret maritime mondial, » explique Rémy Vernet, Directeur de l’activité Digital Supply Chain de SAP France. « Nous sommes également très heureux d’intégrer la startup Française Shippeo que nous avions accompagnée il y a deux ans via notre fonds d’investissement SAP.iO Fund. »

SAP Logistics Business Network fait partie intégrante de SAP Business Network. Ce réseau des réseaux met à profit les informations fournies par l’ERP en temps réel, permet de réaliser des analyses poussées et offre des synergies avec des solutions de business networks performants tels que Ariba® Network – qui relie plus de 5 millions d’entreprises dans le monde et où plus de 3 460 milliards de dollars US d’achat sont traités chaque année.

La fourniture d’une intelligence collective par le biais d’un réseau commercial ouvert et interopérable permet de mettre en place des chaînes d’approvisionnement durables et résilientes, de transformer les business modèles et d’offrir la souplesse nécessaire pour faire face aux crises mondiales.

The post SAP accélère sur sa plateforme collaborative : SAP Logistics Business Network – offrant plus de visibilité et de traçabilité des livraisons et un écosystème partenaire étendu appeared first on SAP France News.

Source de l’article sur sap.com

3 Essential Design Trends, October 2020

Design can make a statement. It evokes feeling and can encourage thought and conversation. That’s the common theme among the three trends in website design this month.

Each trend is rooted on the time and place where we live and includes elements that provoke thought. Kudos to these designers and design teams for jumpstarting conversations. Here’s what’s trending in design this month.

1. “Taking a Stance” Design

From social to environmental issues, design projects are echoing the sentiments of their audiences and organization in a way that take a stance on an issue.

Once taboo, this is becoming increasingly used as a technique for brands who are no longer worried about turning off a certain segment. The goal is to rally the core audience and people who feel the same way about an issue or cause.

There’s also a secondary thing happening here. Some designs aren’t really position based, but use imagery and language that resonates with a movement to associate with that feeling.

Never Heart uses “Join the Revolution” and a dark image with a heart to tug at your feelings. It can help create an association to a cause that you believe in without stating that cause directly. The design feels strong and inviting while making you feel like part of something.

Skye High uses “powerful” twice in the headline to convey a particular messages to women. The agency is looking to work with “powerful” women. It’s a timely statement and message that could resonate with a lot of business-women at various levels of their careers.

Discovered Wildfoods is a brand that is rooted in sustainability. The corporate model and responsibility of the brand shows through in the website. This type of design helps connect people with mutual feelings to the brand and products.

It’s refreshing to see more websites and brands embracing social causes and issues. It can be tricky for a number of reasons. But for some brands, it pays off.

2. Abstract Art Elements

If you are worried about a lack of images, or not sure how to portray images in an appropriate way due to the worldwide pandemic – groups or not, masked or not – abstract art elements can be the solution.

Widely used for startups and apps, more abstract design elements are everywhere. It’s an easy way to create strong visual interest without photography.

The most common use of abstract art elements is often in the form of geometric shapes with animation. This is something that almost anyone can understand and simple shapes and movement can be quite stunning when done well.

The good news is this aesthetic can work for almost any type of website. Try it for a redesign when you don’t have photography that feels appropriate in the current environment or if you want to create focus for content that drives website visitors to the words or scroll. This works with more abstract concepts when they are simple and help you move quickly from the visual to text.

Here’s how each of the examples handles abstract art elements:

Indicius uses bouncing circles that move toward text and down the screen to drive users to the headline and scroll action.

With Code uses a fun fuzzy circle with different animations to draw you in.

Appimized uses bright color and a monotone scheme with geometric shapes to sell its services.

3. Images That Make You Think

This might be the most visually interesting, and thought-provoking, website design trend we’ve seen in a while. These designs all feature images with a little something different or unusual that make you think.

There are a lot of different ways to do this – marry photographs and illustrations, create imaginary imagery, animations or effects, visual tricks that play on depth perception or create pseudo-3D effects.

The commonality is that the visual is so striking and unusual that website visitors stop and engage with the design. What do the “oddball” visuals mean? What message do they convey? How did they do that?

All of the questions could be associated with this different style of visual representation.

Bling uses a combination of a photo with illustrated animated elements to draw the eye. The yin and yang between reality and fantasy is quickly evident and makes you want to know more. (It doesn’t hurt that the animation uses dollars and lightning.)

Kibun is interesting because the photo choices create an optical illusion of depth. It matches the content of the design well because the website features artistic textile panels with an artistic design. The illusion is in the angles and coloring of photographs and their placements on the screen. The only downside of this design is that it loses the artistic panache on mobile because the images stack.

Oddball images can sell. We Are Mad stands out because it uses a contrived image, but doesn’t go oversized with it. The more subtle placement is ideal and arguably more attention-grabbing.

Conclusion

Website design can be a powerful thing, as these trends and examples show. Don’t discredit the power of choices in color, imagery, animation, and text when creating a digital experience. Design can mean a lot of different things depending on the audience as these examples show.

At the same time, these design trends are powerful and meaningful. They provide context into our world, our time, and our feelings. Don’t be afraid to experiment and make a statement with your design work. Just remember to keep in mind all potential impacts (positive and negative) before taking the project live.

Source


Source de l’article sur Webdesignerdepot

La Fondation SAP et Enactus France promeuvent des jeunes projets innovants et au service de la société lors de la nouvelle édition du Social’Tech Challenge

La Fondation SAP France et Enactus France ont organisé l’édition 2020 du Social’Tech Challenge. L’objectif de l’initiative est d’accompagner des projets de lycéens, étudiants et professionnels à développer leurs compétences pour innover et agir au service du plus grand nombre. Enactus France est une entreprise hybride experte de la pédagogie expérientielle et de l’engagement qui rejoint la volonté de SAP d’aider, grâce à la Tech, le monde à mieux fonctionner. Dotées de cette volonté commune, la Fondation SAP France et Enactus France lancent, en 2018, le Social’Tech Challenge, un concours visant à récompenser des projets mettant le numérique au service de la société.

L’association Enactus a pu compter sur la participation et la contribution d’une centaine de collaborateurs SAP. Ces derniers se sont portés volontaires comme mentors d’étudiants entrepreneurs sociaux, jurés du Social’Tech Challenge ou encore jurés de la compétition nationale Enactus. Les collaborateurs SAP ont ainsi sélectionné et monitoré les projets et ont également organisé la journée Boost ton projet Digital. Le 27 avril 2020, 5 projets ont été retenus par un comité de sélection :

  • Bric à Vrac « Pour que tout le monde passe au Vrac »
  • Easy Diab « Le diabète une maladie qui nous concerne tous »
  • Gesture « Vos contenus accessibles aux malentendants »
  • Ovéga « La permaculture accessible à tous »
  • Ticket App « Pourquoi ne pourrions-nous pas simplement avoir nos tickets de caisse sur notre téléphone ? »

La finale du Social’Tech Challenge s’est déroulée le 26 mai 2020 avec un jury d’exception : Caroline Garnier, directrice des ressources humaines SAP France ; Catherine Mort, conseillère cloud et innovation SAP France ; Erik Marcadé, directeur de SAP Labs Paris; et Sébastien Gibier, directeur de SAP.iO Foundry Paris.

C’est Ovéga avec son projet « La permaculture accessible à tous » qui remporte la finale et le prix de 5 000 euros. Le nom du lauréat a été annoncé lors du Festival Enactus qui s’est déroulé cette année virtuellement autour de 3 grands rendez-vous : la finale du Social’Tech Challenge, les demi-finales et la finale de la compétition nationale Enactus pour laquelle Frédéric Chauviré, DG de SAP France, a été juré.

« De nombreux collaborateurs SAP sont impliqués dans l’accompagnement de projets d’entrepreneuriat social qui sont totalement en lien avec la vision de notre Groupe. Le Social’Tech Challenge est une belle initiative que nous mettons en œuvre avec notre partenaire Enactus France, un partenaire de confiance, avec qui nous partageons les mêmes motivations quand il s’agit d’innover et d’agir au servie du plus grand nombre. » Alexandra Darras, responsable de la Fondation SAP France.

À propos de SAP

SAP est le leader du marché des applications d’entreprise : 77% des transactions financières mondiales passent par un système SAP. L’entreprise accompagne les organisations de toute taille et de tout secteur à mieux opérer. Nos technologies de machine learning, d’Internet des objets (IoT), d’analytique avancée et de gestion de l’expérience aident nos clients à transformer leur activité en « entreprise intelligente ». SAP dote les professionnels d’une vision approfondie sur leur activité et favorise la collaboration pour garder une longueur d’avance sur leurs concurrents. Pour les entreprises, nous simplifions la technologie afin qu’elles puissent utiliser nos logiciels comme elles le souhaitent, sans interruption. Notre suite d’applications de bout en bout et nos services permettent à plus de 440 000 clients d’opérer de manière rentable, de s’adapter en permanence et de faire la différence. Avec son réseau mondial de clients, partenaires, employés et leaders d’opinion, SAP aide le monde à mieux fonctionner et à améliorer la vie de chacun. Pour plus d’information, visitez le site www.sap.com

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Why AI & Automation Are Actually Friends to Design

Artificial intelligence. Just hearing the phrase has been a trigger for many in the technology world since that creepy Haley Joel Osment film circa 2001. But more recently, artificial intelligence and machine learning strike fear into the hearts of skilled workers for an entirely different reason: job security, or lack thereof.

Smart-home devices, streaming services, self-checkouts, even Google searches are ways that artificial intelligence has seeped into everyday life, exemplifying the abilities of computers and machines to master both simple and complex tasks. In some instances, these technological advancements make our lives easier, but for some people, their proliferation has meant job loss and skill replacement. There’s no wonder that when artificial intelligence starts being mentioned along with web design and site creation, the spidey senses of designers all over the world start tingling.

designers think outside the box, something that AI just can’t do

But let’s get real about what AI and automation really mean for designers for a second. Talented designers with busy schedules should view these advancements as virtual assistants. For some small businesses on a limited budget, the websites that artificial intelligence can pump out might be fine…for a while. However, as businesses grow, change, require updating and customization to adapt to their customer base, the expertise of creative and talented designers will always be needed. Even the best AI that we see today is limited by evaluating, replicating, and revising what already exists. It may be able to mix 1,000 different color schemes into 10 million potential combinations, but great designers think outside the box, something that AI just can’t do.

In fact, rather than being scared of automation, designers ought to embrace automation and artificial intelligence as a way to unleash their creative thinking. Delegate repetitive, straightforward tasks to the right software, and suddenly you have time to bring your best ideas to the table and push the boundaries of your own innovation. 

Where AI has Failed in Design

The ultimate goal of artificial intelligence and automation in design work is a grand vision that has yet to be realised.

Consider the case of The Grid, which began as a crowdfunding campaign in 2014. The “revolutionary” product posed itself as an artificial intelligence solution for building thoughtfully, yet automatically, designed websites in five minutes. Research “Reviews of the Grid” in any search engine and you’ll be met with scathing criticism with only some small praise sprinkled in. Most of the initial users cite underwhelming results, the feeling of being duped by the Grid’s marketing tactics, nonsensical placement of text, and ultimately, the Grid being a complete waste of money for the resulting product. Even at the low cost of $100, compared to hiring a talented designer, most users felt their investment was wasted.

For the AI capabilities that exist now, most small business owners, or those looking to put together a simple website, are better off using drag and drop site builders (Wix, Squarespace, Weebly, etc) that have been around for ages. Even so, there are plenty of businesses still willing to hire designers to take this simple task off their plate due to a lack of technical expertise or lack of time. And let’s be honest, are there even enough talented (keyword here!) designers out there to keep up with the millions of websites created every year, without each one working themselves to death? 

Where Automation Shines for Designers

Fortunately for good designers, it appears for now that the days of artificial intelligence completely taking over their jobs is a fantasy. However, what AI and automation do offer designers is a solid starting point for success, eliminating much of the lower-level grunt work that most designers would rather skip anyway.

Even well-received AI website builders like Firedrop still require a basic eye for design and specialised knowledge to produce truly unique, high-converting, and user-friendly websites. Tools and practices that designers should adopt are the artificial intelligence and automation resources that will help them do their jobs better, faster, and leave them with more time to focus on project elements that AI cannot accomplish on its own.

Bridging the Gap Between Designers and Developers

Well-established brands are likely to already have design systems in place that guide the creation of new elements across their digital profiles whether on social media, various mobile apps, or different sections of a website. But even in large corporations — excepting those who have perfected the process — there’s often a breakdown between a designer’s vision and resulting product from the developers. It stems from the basic difference in how they each approach their work and the limitations of the systems they use.

While component libraries — or even full design systems for that matter — won’t reconcile every question, they provide both developers and designers a source of truth to work from that both parties can understand. Design collaboration tools like Invision and Visme, specifically, keep designers and developers on the same page with automated version saving and code-friendly workflows.  

Understanding the Consumer

I don’t suggest using artificial intelligence to produce content for your site

Digging into and understanding the behaviours and habits of site users is a relatively new component of site design, but offers invaluable insights. Tools like HotJar, Mouseflow, or Smartlook make it simple to see holes or leaks in your conversion funnels, detect which page elements users are interacting with, and which they’re not interested in to refine the look and feel of a page for maximum conversions. Even though these tools provide the data, it still takes a keen eye and understanding of design to implement the right changes to improve site performance.

Site content is another way that artificial intelligence has the potential to improve our understanding of customer behaviour and improve site performance for individual users. I don’t suggest using artificial intelligence to produce content for your site, no matter how much the results have improved. However, static landing pages or a single set of further reading recommendations are unlikely to appeal to the majority of site visitors. Artificial intelligence tools like CliClap and Personyze instantly collect and analyse consumer data to provide dynamic, personalised experiences that drive more leads and encourage conversions. Creative designers will also learn from this data to improve customer experience with other pages or elements throughout the site.

Removing Distracting, Time-Sucking Administrative Tasks

Because “artificial intelligence” has become a term with such negative connotations, we often overlook the simple way that AI actually makes our work lives better and easier. Machine learning in email filtering is a great example of this. Consider a simple interface like a Gmail inbox. We have the option to mark certain senders as spam or as important, and our inbox learns that type of communication is and isn’t useful to the user. Pandora, Spotify, Apple Music, and more all take cues from the user behaviour of liking a certain song, artists, or genre of music to build customised playlists. There are a myriad of ways that artificial intelligence and its branches of disciplines merge with our everyday lives. 

Some of the most useful automations for business, and especially for designers, are related to the administrative tasks that frequently take time away or distract from more pressing projects. A perfect example of automation that can relieve stress and cut down on mindless work is an email autoresponder. I’ve always found that having time blocked off in my calendar to tackle complex or important projects helps me to focus on the task at hand and be more efficient. In order to more effectively block out my time, closing my email and setting an autoresponder to reply to all incoming emails serves two purposes: 

  1. Lets those trying to get in touch with me know that I only check my email at certain times of the day and that my response may not be immediate — tempering their expectations of when they might hear from me.
  2. Relieves my personal stress of being tethered to my inbox, splitting my focus, and also saves the time of having to initially respond to each email individually. 

This is just one simple way to use automation in your email, although there are many others to explore.

While Zapier isn’t the only workflow automation service on the market, it’s probably the most well known. Workflow automation reduces time spent on mind-numbing, repetitive tasks and helps designers connect apps that might not natively work together. Do you keep a task list in Todoist? Set up a Zap, then create a task in Todoist anytime someone mentions you on Asana or assigns you a task in Trello.

This is especially helpful for freelance designers who work with multiple clients across various project management platforms. The potential for automation to relieve unnecessary mental overhead for designers is nearly limitless.

Don’t be Afraid of AI, Embrace It

The bottom line of this brief overview of artificial intelligence and automation in design is that this emerging technology isn’t something designers should be scared of. In fact, it’s something to welcome with open arms because ultimately it can make our jobs, and our lives, better. Leave the monotonous tasks of collecting and analysing huge amounts of data or administrative minutiae to the machines; they can handle it.

Save the interesting, creative, abstract work for the talented designers who can turn AI recommendations into unique and intuitive digital experiences. Making the relationship between artificial intelligence and design symbiotic will yield the best results for every entity involved: the business, the AI, and yes, even the designer.

 

Featured image via Unsplash.

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