For developers working with low-resource environments that nevertheless wish to harness the full advantages of Kubernetes, the open-source Red Hat MicroShift project and Shipa (an application-as-code platform you can spin up for free) offer a rather compelling pairing. In this article, I’ll take you through the steps of using MicroShift to set up a lightweight Kubernetes distribution, and then manage the same cluster using the “free forever” version of Shipa Cloud. 

But first, why MicroShift? A research project started by Red Hat, MicroShift is built for running Kubernetes clusters in environments with tight resource constraints, such as edge and IoT devices. It’s a memory-optimized lightweight flavor of OpenShift/Kubernetes, and currently supports Fedora, RHEL, and CentOS Linux distributions. Shipa fits in here by helping solve some of the usual problems faced by developers and platform operators. It lets developers focus on what they’re good at and want to do (building applications) and reduces the time platform operators spend on deployments and governance. Onboarding MicroShift to Shipa offers some nice benefits by making it possible to manage multiple clusters from an administration and operations perspective. 

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